12 reasons why we ask for business help

23 10 2006

Here’s a list of common, and not so common, reasons we seek out business help and hire business consultants:

12 Reasons: Why we ask for business help

1. I know what’s wrong, but don’t know how to fix it.

2. I know what’s wrong but don’t have the resources to fix it, what should I do?

3. I know what’s wrong and I know how to fix it, but don’t want to fix it that way, show me another method that is easier, better or less costly.

4. I don’t know what’s wrong. Help me diagnose the organization or situation.

5. I think I know what is wrong and want a second opinion, validation and confirmation.

6. I don’t think anything is wrong, but just to make sure I want you to take a look.

7. I want you to tell me what is wrong so that I can tell you you’re wrong.

8. I want solutions, if they don’t work I want to blame it on you.

9. I want to achieve specific results and don’t have the expertise. I want to hire an expert in order to save time and reduce errors.

10. I have a problem and want to fix it. I don’t want to be wrong and prefer to use experts to guarantee success.

11. I want to be one of the first to learn and implement the “new and improved” business ideas, theories and practices.

12. I am looking for new ideas to break our routine and make it exciting again, make something new happen.

Related Links

10 Reasons why people hire business consultants

The clients I don’t want

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Great International Business Trip Results

16 10 2006

In any international relationship communication and understanding are critical for success.

Problems created by; language, stereotypes, misinformation, lack of information, and cultural misunderstandings combine with normal business problems to create a complicated scenario for anyone involved in international relationships and global business.

Prepare your international meetings and business presentations using the following questions as a guide to organize your ideas and focus on actions that will produce positive results for everyone involved.

6 Questions – Create Great International Business Trip Results

  1. What does this organization know about me, my company and my country?
  2. What do they think they know about me?
  3. What can I tell them that they do not know?
  4. What do I know about my international partner, culture and country?
  5. What do I think I know about this business, culture and country?
  6. What can they tell me that I do not know?

1. What does this organization know about me and my company. When you walk in the room an opinion has already been formed about you, your organization, and your ability to perform in the future. These ideas are based upon facts, information and past experience.

  • What has been the history of our relationship in their country?
  • Who has been involved in our mutual business, and why?
  • What promises have been made and kept by both?
  • What promises have been made and not delivered upon?
  • What have the major problems and success been in the past?
  • Press and media, our organizations promotional material.

2. What do they think they know about me. Clarifying the unknowns or presumed realities in a relationship is crucial to success. These ideas may be very damaging and limit your ability to trust one another. What stereotypical behaviour can you avoid or prevent? What can you clarify or refute through information or actions?

  • Behaviour and reacts based upon past experience with your organization.
  • Rumour and innuendo, press and media reports.
  • Negotiation styles.
  • Business objectives.
  • Behaviour, goals and methods of doing business based upon country and cultural stereotypes.

3. What can I tell them that they do not know. Today’s business world requires trust, information and solutions. Reinforcing your need to work with your international partner, providing important information or solutions, and clarifying misunderstandings can only help the relationship.

  • Clarify or destroy cultural stereotypes.
  • Clarify business objectives and why they are important in order to reach these objectives.
  • Provide solutions and alternatives to existing situations and challenges.
  • Provide information of value for their business and strategy.
  • Clearly identify current or potential business problems.
  • Predict and have answers ready for their questions.

4. What do I know about my International partner, culture and country? What do I know is true and not innuendo or interpretation? The numbers, facts, information, agreements and past performance history of the business. Information about the country and the business culture.

5. What do I think I know about this business, culture and country? What preconceived ideas and stereotypes are you working with? What are you assuming and what has been proven?

6. What can they tell me that I do not know? What questions do you need to ask in order to verify information or create plans. What pieces of your information puzzle are missing? This is the time to get your questions answered, what are they?

Related Links

Cultural misunderstanding it can happen to you

Stereotypes and global business

Create great international business relationships

16 Essential questions – the international business traveller’s quiz

Lessons in international business





Managers choice, rules or limits?

22 09 2006

I found myself in strong disagreement to this post on Lifehack.org, Reining in the Rule Breakers.

I understand the need for policies and rules to insure employee safety. This post might be appropriate for those situations. It also might be justified when attempting to standardize jobs and activities that require no creativity or individual decision making in order to function correctly. I sense the post was geared to managers dealing with these type of positions.

This approach toward strict adherence to the “rules”, just smacks of a 1930’s factory or grade school, and is the exact opposite of what I feel a workplace in 2006 requires to remain creative, enthusiastic and productive.

I do think it’s important to define limits. Very different from rules. Limits give maximum or minimum boundaries, but do not bind individuals into procedures and don’t stifle creativity.

It is important to define goals and objectives, basic coordinated procedures and time limits. Allow the team, organization or individual to find the best path to the goal. Before you scream chaos and anarchy, understand that standard operating procedures and existing policies will normally be the jumping off point for most of the organization. Any changes that occur to those procedures will often be evolutionary, not revolutionary.

Focus your energy and your people on objectives and not on blindly following the rules.

Related Links

Successful managers should be breaking the rules

What are the rules? Hopefully, none.

5 ways to promote creative thinking and idea generation

Is your boss a prison warden or party host?





Industrial and Business Parks in Mexico

20 09 2006

Looking for a “plug and play” solution for your business or factory in Mexico? Take a hard look at the advantages that Mexican industrial parks offer.

AMPIP (Mexican Association of Business and Industrial Parks) can partner with you and provide contacts and information about Mexico’s industrial and business parks. They work closely with private industry, state and local governments and real estate organizations in order to provide solutions for companies seeking to quickly and easily establish a physical presence in Mexico.

“Investment Promotion
AMPIP has become one of Mexico’s leading agencies for the promotion of foreign investment projects, thanks to its participation in national and international shows, the advertising in specialized media, the alliance with other business associations and the permanent contact with a wide network of corporations and real estate players, as well as with government officials.

Part of the promotion activities include the registration of industrial assets owned by AMPIP members in our Industrial Real Estate Promotion System, available on-line at our Internet site, apart from the printed material, such as location maps edited in conjunction with the Mexican Bank for Foreign Trade (Bancomext), which are distributed worldwide.”

There are specific and unique advantages of industrial and business parks. Saving time and money are among the biggest factors. Access to transportation, power and communication infrastructure is another. The definition of “Industrial Park” will provide some idea of the other advantages.

“What is an Industrial Park?

An industrial park is a delimited extension of land, characterized by four main aspects:

1. It is located close to transport facilities, such as hightways, airports, sea ports and railways.

2. It concentrates essential dedicated infrastructure in one location for industrial operations, such as water (including sewer lines, drainage systems), electricity (including high power supply lines), telecommunications and roads.

3. It fulfills all the prerequisites to obtain the permission from local authorities for the set up of new operations (construction, environment, etc.)

4. It has a central administration that coordinates the internal safety of assets, the maintenance of public infrastructure, the promotion of new operations and the affairs with local authorities”

For more detailed information, contact: Associacion Mexicana de Parques Industriales, Monte Camerùn 54 – 1, Colonia Lomas de Barrilaco, C.P. 11010, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, Mèxico D.F., Mexico Tel. +52 (55) 2623-2216 Fax +52 (55) 2623-2218 Email ampip@ampip.org.mx

Related Links

AMPIP Mexican Association of Business and Industrial Parks

Official Government websites of the 32 Mexican states

How to do business in Mexico

How to negotiate with Mexican business people

Mexican official (and unofficial) holidays

Tip: How to call Mexico from the US

What to dial in order to reach a cellular phone in Mexico

Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico

Meeting people in Mexico – kiss, shake hands or hug?

Before you go on your business trip to Mexico

Tipping Guidelines for Mexico





Showtime – how do you want to live your life?

8 09 2006

I’ve had limited experience in show business. The highlights of my entertainment career include the magic show I produced and starred in at age 8, various band performances, and a walk-on supporting role as a wise man in a Nativity play. Oh wait, I forgot to mention, my biggest show business role. I was involved in retail sales.

Retail sales can be a limiting and brutal environment, physically and emotionally. But it is one of the best environments for learning and practicing how to perform with and for others.

Retail sales is all about people, it is not about merchandise. Listening to what people want and helping them find it. You are performing all day, and when you realize this, it can be an exhilarating and fun experience. You can prepare, rehearse and modify your performances daily.

What am I talking about? Performing? Exactly. If you assume the role of an enthusiastic, informed and helpful person you can give something to each person you encounter during the day. You will feel great about yourself and the client or co-worker walks away with an unexpected gift of meeting and connecting with a positive human experience.

I was involved in the fresh flower industry. Olga and I opened a “bucket-shop”, which at the time was an innovation, and dedicated ourselves to making every customers experience distinct and important.

No one buys flowers because they have to. They are sought when one wishes to celebrate a birthday, anniversary, birth of child, graduation, religious holiday, or wedding. They might be using the flowers to recognize an illness or death, as a thank you, to recognize a special person, to say I love you or I’m sorry, or as a emotional pick me up.

Flowers are objects that represent an emotion. Customers were not buying flowers. They were seeking a symbol of their feelings or the feelings they wished to transmit. Isn’t that true about most consumer items?

Understanding this, how can you NOT be enthusiastic about coming to work and giving your best performance?

During the time clients were in our environment, we were part of their search to represent their emotions, our advice was of great importance in order to find the right symbol, the perfect flowers. It was much more than a commodity transaction.

It’s important to recognize that false enthusiasm isn’t going to work. You have to believe in yourself, your abilities and knowledge. You have to believe that you are going on-stage everyday, and that your “performance” has to be genuine. You have to listen to the people around you, and determine what they are really seeking, and help them get it.

People used to stop in and visit us to get a shot of enthusiasm and positive attitude. There was always a smile, a greeting. The environment was light, fun, open, accepting. It was an amazing experience for us and for the clients. We gave a positive attitude, and customers gave us back more positive attitude.

All it took was our dedication to providing the best “performance” we could manage, everyday, no matter who was in the audience.

It’s “showtime” in your life every morning (remember Rob Schneider’s performance in “All that Jazz”?). It’s your decision to assume the role you are going to play. Will it be the angry, grumpy, distracted, negative you? Will it be the upbeat, enthusiastic, focused you?

It’s “showtime” right now.

It’s always “showtime”.

Related Links

Change your life – change your attitude

Passion – Enthusiasm – Common Sense?

Motivation, what gets you out of bed?





10 reasons why people hire a business consultant

7 09 2006

Business consultants are an important part of our business culture. We have discovered that hiring consultants and outside experts can save us time and money. It also can increase our competitiveness and professionalism.

Consultants work best for those organizations or individuals who know what they are seeking and have clearly defined projects or objectives.

The following list provides 10 reasons why you might want to hire a business consultant.

10 reasons why business consultants are hired:

  • To provide a “short-cut” to know-how, knowledge and information that does not exist in the organization
  • To provide a professional service that does not exist in the organization, or that is needed for a specified period of time
  • To provide solutions to specific challenges and situations
  • To validate ideas that have already been created in the organization
  • To analyze, diagnose or criticize (constructively)
  • To facilitate the search for ideas and solutions with existing team members
  • To facilitate, create and implement methodologies and systems that enhance efficiency and organization
  • To access a network of business or government contacts
  • To bring in an experienced “outsiders” evaluation and point of view
  • To present, teach or implement “new” business ideas and procedures

Sept. 8, 2006 – Just found this at HorsePigCow, good ideas and comments about the role of the consultant, their value and why people tend de-value their role. The Value of Consultants

Related Link

The clients I don’t want





Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico

4 09 2006

Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico and Mexicans.

1. It is difficult to reach the top executives and business owners. The first contacts are difficult or impossible to make through “cold calling”. A much better strategy is to get personal introductions from consultants or other local business people.

2. Mexico is all about personal networks. They prefer to do business “face to face”. Impersonal methods of communication will be used, but plan on meeting your clients or suppliers as often as possible in order to maintain good relations and communications.

2. Use metric measurements, forget all other systems. Inches, pounds, feet, yards are not part of the Mexican culture. This is especially true for your promotional material and catalogues.

3. Don’t expect business people will return your phone calls. If the business item is important you should call several times.

4. Business negotiations will always be preceded with small talk and light conversation. This may continue for some time before business is finally discussed. Dinners and lunches are important for negotiations and often the items of real importance surface over coffee and dessert.

5. Proper etiquette and manners are very important. You will find the Mexicans are very cordial and polite, and they expect the same treatment from others. This is true for business and social occasions.

6. Secretaries and personal assistants are very important. They control who has access to executives and decision-makers. Many times they are responsible for answering the executive’s email and correspondence. Never underestimate the power of the secretary, and always maintain a friendly cordial relationship with them.

7. Meetings don’t start, or end on time. Don’t come late, but don’t get angry or upset when it doesn’t happen at the appointed hour.

8. The entire country shuts down from December 15 until about January 3 for vacations. Do not expect to find decision-makers in their offices, and expect slowdowns in logistics, paperwork and other communications during this time.

9. Everyone has a cellular phone. Get the cellular phone numbers of your contacts to avoid the filters in place at the office.

10. Mexicans tend to be reserved with foreign business people in the first business encounters. Business in Mexico is based upon trust between people. Take the time to create a relationship and build trust with your clients and suppliers. Don’t be in a hurry to close the deal. Don’t be in a rush to get the business over with. Don’t be afraid to visit several times without a specific work agenda. Get to know the people and culture.

11. Mexicans don’t like to disappoint others, and may prolong and delay bad news until the last possible moment. This can be prevented by establishing many short term objectives and chronologies. Constant open communication will also provide opportunities to discuss and find solutions for any set backs before it becomes a major problem.

12. Always try and deal with the boss or top executives. Business is done, approved and maintained by the top levels in the organization. Make sure the Mexican company understands that you are your company’s top executive with important decision-making powers.

Related Links

How to negotiate with Mexican business people

Meeting people in Mexico -kiss, shake hands or hug

Before you go on your business trip to Mexico

Tip: How to call Mexico from the US

How to do business in Mexico, parts 1 – 28