New website for Lee Iwan

7 08 2010

I have moved to a new website  LeeIwan.com!

Popular posts from the old site Lee Iwan Accumulated Experience will be updated and migrated, and new material added to the new site at breakneck speed.

By visiting and participating you will get insight and learn about the attitudes, actions and strategies that will increase results and reduce errors with international and Mexican business projects.

Examples:

  • How to effectively start a business relationship in Mexico
  • How to develop a strategic plan for the Mexican market
  • How to develop a realistic business plan – objectives and chronologies
  • How to creating trust and confidence from your first meeting
  • The “right way” to approach Mexican business people
  • How to find the right people in Mexico
  • How to integrate the secrets of doing business in Mexico into your activities and communications
  • How to avoid the most common mistakes that can sabotage you
  • How to construct a solid base of reliable  knowledge and contacts
  • How to focus and get results in each stage of business development:  investigation, cultivation, harvest
  • How to create a positive image based on actions and deeds
  • How to maximize your customer visits, trade fairs and commercial missions
  • How to avoid cultural mistakes in Mexico
  • How to use the power of patience to guarantee success
  • How to use communications to avoid misunderstandings and increase commitment to the business
  • How to avoid the stereotypes that will kill the deal
  • How to find the decision-makers in Mexico
  • How to find the resources and reliable information to make informed decisions
  • How to understand the Mexican business environment, how business people think, what they consider important, how they make decisions and why
  • How to surround yourself with support service experts to avoid costly start-up errors

Thanks for stopping by, please leave a comment, idea or your observations on how I might improve the site and information.

Lee

Website – Lee Iwan.com





Social network site – Mexico economic development

25 07 2007

I was invited to a new social networking site on the Ning network, Build Bridges Not Walls!.

The idea behind the site:

“People that want economic development in Mexico will trade together. This site is to put people together for electric handshakes, trade, new business ideas or just old friends finding each other again.”

Members can add photos, videos, blog entries, comments and meet others with similar interests about business and economic issues related to Mexico.

Looks like it will be an interesting site.

Related Links

Build Bridges Not Walls!

Ning, create your own social network





Observations on illegal immigration in the US, possible solutions

25 05 2007

 What are we going to do with illegal immigration and illegal immigrants?

How do we stop illegal immigration?

How do we control immigration?

Take away the angry rhetoric, xenophobia, unsubstantiated claims and statistics and we see an problem that is global in scope and range.

It’s an economic issue. It’s a political issue.  It’s an emotional issue.  It’s a human issue.  It’s a moral issue.  There is no absolute “right or wrong” or “black and white”.

Poor people want to improve their condition and look toward wealthy countries as places of opportunity and employment.

Wealthier countries cannot allow uncontrolled immigration and growth if they wish to sustain their economic advantage and growth patterns.

Who has the right to live and work here or there?

There are two important issues at the heart of the issue:

1.  A country (government) has the right to close, defend and control their borders and all immigration.

This is a no-brainer, of course a country can do whatever they want with their border, immigration and foreign trade. It is their right to make the rules and regulations that govern their territory and for those who wish to enter the country.

Of course we have to remember that the US border consists of over 12,034 km of land boundaries and 19,924 km of coastline.

This makes total enforcement of the border a difficult if not impossible task. Keeping people out of the USA with walls is not possible.

Controlling the border, monitoring legal immigration  and enforcing laws to control or eliminate illegal immigration for the benefit of the country and it’s citizens is the goal of any good immigration policy.

2. What to do with existing immigrants currently living and working in the country?

This is the tricky one.

The US has clear laws and policies regarding illegal immigration, they have been in place for years.  The lack of enforcement and lack of application of the laws has resulted in 12 to 20 million illegal immigrants currently residing in the USA.

Solutions and Alternatives for existing illegal immigrants in the USA

1.  Provide Citizenship.  Allowing “fast track” to citizenship for existing illegal immigrants in the US sidesteps or ignores laws in place that were never seriously enforced over the past years.

Legal challenges, fairness issues, political problems all prevent this solution from being proposed, evaluated and accepted.

Arguably the best, fastest, cheapest solution that will not disrupt the economy in the short term.

Another problem to consider is that of trust.  Will an illegal immigrant trust a government program that brings them out of hiding and identifies them?

The next issue, if all the illegal immigrants sign up and become US citizens are they paying their taxes, are their employers withholding taxes?  If not there is a new legal challenge, the identification of tax evaders at the business and personal level.

2.  Find them and deport them.  Enforce the current laws.   Tracking down and deporting all illegal immigrants is not logical or cost effective due to the estimated amount of immigrants in the US. (10,000,000 to 20,000,000 according to some estimates).

It is the best political solution, makes headlines and polarizes people.  The idea that “we are just enforcing the law” is heard by followers of this strategy.

Unfortunately it also disrupts the economy at the local level when communities or workplaces are singled out for “raids” and massive deportation.

If there were a method to identify and return all illegals to their countries quickly the US economy would fall into a huge recession or depression due to the sudden and massive loss of labor.

If the US had been enforcing their immigration laws over the past years they would not have this situation.

But they didn’t do this enforcement in the past, and now what?

3.  Make new legislation prohibiting interaction and financial transactions with illegal immigrants. Good political solution, great headlines but does little to stop the underlying economic differences between the US and other countries (the reason why people immigrate).

New laws do not stop or slow down the entrance of illegal immigrants.  The fundamental problem continues, and is now criminalized further (reflect on how effective the laws were during Prohibition and currently against drugs in terms of stopping their use and commercialization).

Creates an underground economy (housing, fraudulent documents and I.D., etc.)  and increase the opportunities for illegal immigrants to be exploited and organized crime to get involved.

Creates an atmosphere of distrust, fear, xenophobia which creates violence, prejudice and hate between ethic groups and socioeconomic groups. Turning the average citizen into the police, judge and jury is not recommended.

If the current laws are not enforced, do we need to make more?

4.  Create a temporary permit or permission to allow immigrants to work.  This makes sense if there is a need for immigrant workers in the US economy. It allows them to work, pay taxes, and participate in the infrastructure.

The major problem here is that the US employee does not want to pay taxes, benefits and competitive wages to low wage workers.  This is not because they are bad people, it’s because to be competitive they require the lowest costs possible, and taxes reduce their competitive advantage.

The lawmakers will not be able to determine how many individuals should be allowed in yearly, or for how long.

Paying taxes is not an issue for the illegal immigrant.  Getting a job that pays is an issue.

The enforcement of immigration “after the border” should be focused upon identifying those businesses who hire illegal immigrants and don’t pay the corresponding taxes and benefits.

This is hugely unpopular with politicians, because businesses are filled with voters. It is easier to confront individuals with no rights, no legal protection and no right to vote than it is to confront US citizens with the power to vote you out of office.

Every US agency that deals with the Federal or State economic development has voiced the opinion that immigrant workers are a required and essential part of the US economy and necessary for future economic growth.  Required and essential.

5.  Do nothing   This was the unofficial policy for many years.  Border control was present and legal immigration controlled but illegal immigration control was not enforced 100%.

The general US government view was that supply and demand would control the flow of required illegal immigration.

The economic and political cost vs. benefit of eliminating this necessary source of low cost labor was considered, and the reaction was tolerance and silence.

This is changing rapidly with the upcoming 2008 US elections.  It is an emotional issue and a polarizing issue with US voters, and emotional polarizing issues wind up being central issues during Presidential political campaigns.

The immigration issue is a hot topic in Europe, and new political faces are emerging worldwide trumpeting the issue of “preserving the culture” and “controls on immigration”.

It’s a sign of the global times, we are now able to quickly migrate anywhere.  Our government and society’s abilities to accept new immigrants is being challenged and overloaded.

We need to look at the fundamental causes of immigration, and determine long term global actions that will eliminate the need for people to leave their own countries.

At the same time evaluate current and new immigration policies and laws with a single focus; what is the best for the country, it’s growth, it’s future and it’s current citizens?

Related Links

Illegal Immigration – USA and Mexico 

American Immigration Resources on the Web 

Can’t make a decision 





Mexico Investment Portal

15 05 2007

Aaron Burda and I have begun work on a very interesting (and hopefully useful) project.  Providing information and online links, in English, for foreign investors and businesses wishing to examine, analyze and evaluate Mexico for business operations.

The Mexico Investment Information Project (link)

We are a Creative Commons licensed project (i.e. not for profit) whose mission is to provide the best online resource to foreign businesses looking to invest in Mexico. Currently online is a very rough “mock up” of a website that we are planning to build over the next several months.

If you would like to participate in the project and feel you have some valuable expertise to contribute please apply for a userid.

Project History
The Investment Portal is a combination of two projects. Lee Iwan’s Business South of the Border Blog and Aaron Burda’s UC Davis Graduate School of Management Mexico Research Project. Both Lee and Aaron were convinced that the quality of the information available on the Internet about doing Business in Mexico could be substantially improved.

Project Future
We hope to organize the existing Internet English language resources about doing business in Mexico and add to it through having select volunteers write succinct articles on relevant business topics.

If you are a Banker, Lawyer, Accountant, Environmental Expert, HR Manager, Logistics Manager or other qualified and experienced individual with business expertise about Mexico and would like to provide information, advice, or website links to this project, don’t hesitate to contact us.

Related Information

Mexico Investment Portal

Understand Mexico Blog 

Business South of the Border 





Determine cultural conflicts between Mexico and your home country

26 03 2007

This site will help determine possible cultural conflicts between your home culture and Mexico.

It compares 4 dimensions of cultural differences; Power Distance, Individuality, Uncertainty Avoidance and Masculinity.

From the site: “Welcome to the Intercultural Business Communication tool. This simple online tool offers a great resource for people wanting to get some intercultural business communication tips when working with people from different cultures. All you do is choose your own country and another country and we produce a graph that shows the the major differences between the two cultures. You then get some insightful intercultural business communication tips for working in or with that culture.”

Intercultural Business Communication Tool

It provides a comparison between the countries, and then provides tips in order to reduce or manage this cultural gap.

Very interesting.

Related Links

Intercultural Business Communication Tool – Kwintessential Language and Cultural Specialists

Geerte Hofstede, Cultural Dimensions

Cultural Misunderstanding- it can happen to you

Create great international business relationships





Quick start – doing business in Mexico

22 03 2007

I made a lens over at Squidoo that provides a good starting point for anyone beginning to analyze Mexico as a country to do business with.

Doing Business in Mexico

Would very much like your feedback, advice and tips on any links that should be added.

Related Links

Squidoo – Doing Business in Mexico

Squidoo – International Business Trip Planning

Squidoo – Leon, Guanajuato

Business South of the Border





Mexico – Links to economic and financial statistics

20 03 2007

An inquiry from Andrzej from Poland regarding sites that provide economic data for Mexico has prompted me to provide the following links.

The official and definitive source for Mexican statistics is INEGI (the National Statistics, Geography and Information Institute). There is one little glitch however, it’s only available in Spanish INEGI Instituto Nacional de Estadisticas, Geographia y Informacion.

The OECD (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development) has a statistical profile of Mexico, covering 40 statistical databases. OECD Statistics Mexico

The World Bank Doing Business site offers indicators of the regulatory costs of doing business in Mexico and is comparable with 175 economies. Doing Business Explore Economies – Mexico.

The Banco Nacional de Mexico, BANIXCO offers a site with up-to-date macro and financial market data about the country and monetary policies. BANIXCO Economic and Financial Indicators.

Another source of economic information about Mexico can be found through contacting the Mexican Embassy or Mexican Consulate in your part of the world. The Economic or Commercial Officer will be able to provide the information you are seeking. Mexican Embassies and Mexican Consulates worldwide.

Related Links

IMF predicts strong economic growth for Mexico

Global competitiveness – 2006 – Mexico and China

General reference links for doing business in Mexico

How to do business in Mexico





Discount and Budget Airlines in Mexico

16 01 2007

Low cost and budget airlines are finding their way to Mexico.

These new airlines are offering international flights and national flights between intermediate cities in Mexico previously only accessible through bus lines or at much higher prices via the full service airlines.

The budget minded vacation or business traveller should check out the schedules and prices of these airlines next time you are travelling in and around Mexico.

Aero California

Aladia

Alma de Mexico

America West

ATA

A Volar

Aviacsa

Azteca

Click Mexicana

Frontier

InterJet

Jet Blue

MagniCharters

Mexus Airlines

Spirit

Ted

Viva Aerobus

Volaris

Related Links

Attitude Travel Latin America Low Cost Airlines

Discount Airlines in Mexico

How to call Mexico from the US

Airport Codes for Mexico





Christmas bonus – the aguinaldo in Mexico

5 12 2006

Employers in Mexico are required by law, to give employees a Christmas bonus.

The “aguinaldo” is a mandatory annual payment given in the month of December, prior to the 20th, to each worker in Mexico.  This includes all employees in private industry, and all government employees.

The aguinaldo is equivalent to 15 days wages, or more.  For employees with less than a years service, a pro-rated payment is provided.

This puts added strain on cash flow and accounts payables for Mexican organizations during the month of December.  At the same time it creates a huge burst of economic activity throughout the country.

Related Links

Christmas parties and holiday gifts in Mexico

Mexican official and unofficial holidays

How to do business in Mexico





Indirect messages and business etiquette in Mexico

28 11 2006

A comment from .hj highlighted an important issue when doing business in Mexico.  He wrote ” (Mexicans) will try to deliver a message using indirect messages and almost never telling things directly for it is consider unpolite”

Etiquette and formal behaviour is expected in Mexican business negotiations, especially with international clients or suppliers.   This will become more relaxed and informal over time, as the trust is reinforced and expectations are met on both sides.

It is all about mutual respect.

The formal rules and behaviours (etiquette) that enhance and create an atmosphere of respect have been broken down or eliminated in the USA, but in Mexico they are critical and very much a part of business dealings.

The Mexican business person does not like to create a confrontation or criticize openly, it is considered rude and ill mannered.  One should be very perceptive to what is being said by your Mexican partner, what is being avoided and the implications of each behaviour.

One should avoid open criticism of the Mexican partner.   They expect the same formality given to you, it is embarrassing and awkward if one begins to point fingers and rant and rave.

Make comments and observations about areas that need attention, strategies and solutions that must be adapted and challenges that must be met instead of criticism of past performance.  Discuss what is working and what isn’t working, but don’t personalize it.

You may not hear direct criticism of an idea or proposal, instead there might be suggestions of alternatives.

Your ideas, proposals and solutions may be greeted by nodding heads and smiling faces, but it may only signify that the audience is listening, and not in complete agreement.

Decision-making on sensitive or unpopular issues may be delayed and not openly debated.  Give your Mexican partner time to deal with these issues, and don’t force a decision in public.

If able to plan the meetings in advance, propose an agenda, and include the issues you need to discuss, or that require a decision.  Give them time to prepare for the meeting and the decision-making required.  Don’t demand a decision in an open meeting.

Lunches and informal settings are where the real business discussions and dialogues will take place, and even then, will be presented may be in a vague and non-confrontational manner.  Use these moments to explain and explore the ideas, benefits and alternatives.  Listen.

Present yourself and treat your business relationships as a well educated respectful gentleman, not like a threatening conquering warrior barbarian.  Participate, listen and react to business situations with poise, calm and politeness.

Related Links

How to negotiate with Mexican business people

Doing Business in Mexico – cultural tips

How to speed up doing business in Mexico

Speeches and Protocol in Mexico





Christmas parties and holiday business gifts in Mexico

27 11 2006

The month of December is Mexico is filled with Christmas and holiday parties and social events.

The population of Mexico is 95%+ Christian and openly celebrates Christmas in private industry and government displays. Be aware that there are other religious groups in Mexico that do not celebrate Christmas in order to avoid offending suppliers or clients.

These Christmas and holiday reunions are usually mid-day dinners or late suppers. There will be get-togethers for friends, business acquaintances, associations and any committees or other groups that you might belong to.

There is also the company Christmas party.

Failure to attend the holiday events are noticed and considered rude. It’s better to arrive and steal away early than to avoid the reunions all together. Remember Mexico is a very socially oriented culture, failure to attend and participate in the social events will not help you, it might work against you.

Corporate and business gift giving is very important, and in many cases expected at Christmas time. The low end gifts range from the traditional; calendars and pens, agendas, calculators or other promotional type gifts to the higher end: fine liquors (Tequila, Scotch whiskey, Cognac, Red wine), fine food baskets, electronic equipment (Palms, IPods, etc.), gift certificates to restaurants, etc.

Unlike the USA, it is common in Mexico to give holiday gifts to the decision-makers in the purchasing department unless the companies have a policy against it.

Cut flowers or live plants are not considered an appropriate business gift.

Holiday gifts are given to important (and not so important) clients or to key people in the clients organization with whom you have a personal/business relationship (for example the secretary who answers all your calls or the logistics person who solves problems all year long).

Some transnational companies have tried to limit and reduce the amount and quality of business Christmas gifts in the past few years. It is not looked upon kindly by customers who always reflect upon the amount of money they have spent with the supplier, and believe the Christmas gift is a “thank you” and recognition of their support and loyalty throughout the year.

Work begins to slow down in Mexico at the beginning of December, and after December 12 (The Day of Guadalupe) efficiency grinds to a halt. It’s impossible to get major decisions, and many times difficult to locate business owners and managers due to events and social engagements.

Most Mexican businesses (not in tourist areas) are closed during the week between Christmas (Dec. 25) and the New Year (Jan 1). The Mexican government prohibits highway transport of certain goods and tractor trailers during this peak family vacation period.

Related Links

How to do business in Mexico

Mexican official and unofficial holidays

Tipping guidelines for Mexico

Doing Business in Mexico – cultural tips

Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico

Corruption, bribes, mordidas, tips – doing business in Mexico





Mexican politics – what business people should know

22 11 2006

In order to begin to understand Mexican politics (an impossible task), it’s important to learn some fundamentals of the political system in Mexico.

  • There is no re-election for political officials for the same post in Mexico. Current office holders can sit-out a term and run again for the same office, or they can run for another political post.
  • The political parties control the selection of party candidates who run for office, at Federal, State and local levels. Political parties, and their leaders are very important.
  • In order to be remain in politics one must please both the party and the electorate.
  • The term for the President of Mexico is for 6 years, with no re-election.
  • The term for State Governor is 6 years, with no re-election.
  • The term for Senators is 6 years, with no re-election for a consecutive term.
  • The term for the Camara de Diputados (similar to the House of Representatives in the US) is 3 years, with no re-election for a consecutive term.
  • The term for local mayor is 3 years with no re-election for a consecutive term.
  • The term for State representatives and local elected positions is normally 3 years, with no re-election for a consecutive term.
  • Changes in the Mayor, Governor or President, cause major reshuffling of bureaucrats and administrative officials. This causes a slowdown or “unofficial” shutdown of some government offices between the election date and the date of the new administration start-up.
  • The lack of re-election encourages and favors the current politicians and parties in power to seek out projects with short term visible benefits. They are pushed to show successes, infrastructure projects or other tangible benefits during their term of office in order to get promoted and elected to future political posts.
  • In the Mexican states with stable, well defined political party tendencies and majorities, there is more focus on medium and long term projects and planning as the benefits can be attributed to the party.
  • If selling a long term project to the government, it should include short term benefits, or tangible results, so that the politicians involved can claim credit.
  • Never try and initiate the sale or negotiation of a major project to the State government during the last 6 months or year of a Governors term. It will be stalled, and you will have to “resell” it to the new administration.
  • Get to know as many local and State and Federal political officials as possible, in 3 to 6 years they are all sitting in different positions of power and influence in the government.

Related Links

How to do business in Mexico, Politics and Political Parties

How to speed up business decisions in Mexico

Patience, chaos and doing business in Mexico

Official websites of the Mexican states

Best States for business in Mexico – World Bank Report 2007





How to tell if your Mexican banknotes are counterfeit

18 11 2006

How to tell if your Mexican banknotes are counterfeit.

The handling of foreign currency creates a whole new set of challenges for the business or vacation traveller.

The Bank of Mexico has a webpage dedicated to explaining the security features of the Mexican coins and banknotes so you don’t get bamboozled. Verifying Mexican banknote authenticity

Learn about the security features in Mexican banknotes to eliminate the possibility of receiving “funny money” during your travels.

Security features in manufactured Mexican banknotes – A quick chart to help identify the security features in the current banknotes in circulation in Mexico.

Security features in the 20 Peso polymer banknote

Security features in the 50 Peso paper banknote

Security features in the 100 Peso banknote

Security features in the 200 Peso banknote

Security features in the 500 Peso banknote

Security features in the 1000 Peso banknote

If you believe you have counterfeit Mexican currency, bring it to the attention of a Mexican bank for verification. If the banknote is counterfeit you will not be reimbursed for it’s value, but you might avoid going to jail. Passing counterfeit currency is illegal in Mexico.

The US Department of State Consular information sheet for Mexico states A number of Americans have been arrested for passing on counterfeit currency they had earlier received in change. If you receive what you believe to be a counterfeit bank note, bring it to the attention of Mexican law enforcement.”

Related Links

Mexican currency, monetary policy and financial systems – BANXICO

Banco de Mexico – BANXICO – Bank of Mexico





Top states for business in Mexico – World Bank Report 2007

17 11 2006

I highly recommend that you download and read the Doing Business in Mexico 2007 report, released on November 15, 2006.

For anyone currently doing business in Mexico, or thinking about doing business in Mexico, this is a must read.

The World Bank Group has announced that “Doing business became easier in many Mexican states in 2005-2006, according to the new Doing Business in Mexico 2007 report, released today in Mexico City. The report finds that some states compare well with the best of the world, while others need much reform to become globally competitive.” – November 15, 2006

Quick results of the top ten Mexican states based upon the factors of; starting a business, registering property, obtaining credit, and enforcing a contract include:

  1. Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes (Easiest)
  2. Guanajuato, Celaya
  3. Nuevo Leon, Monterrey
  4. Sonora, Hermosillo
  5. Campeche, Campeche
  6. Zacatecas, Zacatecas
  7. Queretaro, Queretaro
  8. Michoacan, Morelia
  9. Sinaloa, Culiacan
  10. Mexico City (Most difficult)

A full listing of all the 31 Mexican states is available in the report.

Excerpt from the report: “If you were to open a new business in Mexico City, the start-up procedures would take 27 days on average, 8 days fewer than in Shanghai. If you decided to open a business in Guanajuato or Aguascalientes, you would have to wait 12 days—only one day longer than your competitor in Amsterdam. But if you needed to take a customer to court for a simple debt default in Guanajuato, resolving the dispute would take 304 days—far longer than the 217 days it takes in Dublin,1 but significantly shorter than in Baja California Sur where it takes 581 days. These examples illustrate two patterns. First, some Mexican states compare well with the best in the world. Second, many states need much reform to become globally competitive.”

Related Links

Press release on Doing Business in Mexico 2007 (PDF, 75KB)

Doing Business in Mexico 2007 (PDF, 1.26MB)

World Bank Report – Doing Business in Mexico 2005





Speeches and protocol in Mexico

17 11 2006

Speeches for private industry, trade association and government events are quite common in Mexico.

  • Every event is started with a speech, or number of speeches from local, state or federal government officials, association presidents or high ranking members or the corresponding private industry equivalents.
  • Generally when a speech is given in Mexico to a group, formal protocol is followed.
  • For larger events a professional master of ceremonies will be hired to make the speaker introductions and keep the event moving.
  • Each speaker thanks and acknowledges by name and title each member sharing the stage or table of honor.
  • Mention of each member should be given by rank. Highest ranking official or member first, followed by the others in descending order.
  • Speeches in Mexico tend to be long. Government officials tend to give lots of numbers and statistics. Despite the audience’s desire to hear a short, focused discourse.
  • It is considered rude to take cell phone calls, carry on conversations with your neighbor, crack jokes or not pay attention during the speeches. If you can’t tolerate it, excuse yourself and leave the room.
  • Often invited guests and members sharing the podium do not have anything important to say, they are invited as a courtesy or as part of the political/social protocol.
  • After the initial speeches are over, some government officials may leave for other events.
  • Use these opportunities to network and exchange business cards. It is often easier to make initial contact with important figures at an event instead of via telephone calls and emails to their office.

Related Links

International business – cultural mistakes

Create great international business relationships

Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico

Meeting people in Mexico – kiss, shake hands or hug?





Mexican currency, monetary policy and financial systems – BANXICO

16 11 2006

Everything you want to know about Mexican monetary policy, Mexican financial and payment systems, Mexican currency, Mexican banknotes and Mexican coins can be found at the Banco de Mexico site:  BANXICO English language website.

BANXICO: “Banco de México is the central Bank of Mexico. Under the Constitution, it is autonomous in its operations and management. Its main function is to provide currency to the domestic economy. In discharging this task, the Bank’s priority is to ensure the stability of the currency’s purchasing power. Its other functions are to promote both the sound development of the financial system and the optimal functioning of the payment systems.”

The BANXICO site includes detailed sections on:

Need to know what the currency and coins currently in circulation in Mexico look like? Check out the sections entitled

Related Links

BANXICO Foreign Exchange Market

BANXICO Securities Market

BANXICO Inflation





Sourcing and supply chain strategy – Mexico

16 11 2006

Purchasing from Mexico and Mexican suppliers?

Don Gringo at Catemaco News and Commentary brought these items to our attention.

Sourcing in Mexico gets easier.  The article points out that doing business with Mexico is easier than in the past.

  • The proximity of Mexico to the US markets impacts communication, logistics, costs and time factors.
  • Mexico has a history of dealing with the US, and are familiar with competitive manufacturing techniques.
  • Relationships are critical to success.
  • Beware of stereotypes.
  • Take the time to find the “right” partner.
  • Do’s and don’ts for doing business in Mexico

Does your supply chain strategy include Mexico?  It should.  Al Brown president of SupplyMex writes that Mexico offers:

  • Logistics infrastructure, highways, rail and port system that has been improved over the past 10 years.
  • Free trade agreements with 42 countries.
  • Global production and quality standards.
  • Stable political and economic environment.
  • Skilled workforce.

Thanks Don.
Related Links

Purchasing.com

Why you should pay attention to free-trade treaties 

Maquiladoras in Mexico

Industrial and Business Parks in Mexico





Corruption in Mexico

15 11 2006

Corruption in Mexico.

Quite a bit of interest generated from the piece regarding corruption and bribery in Mexico. Corruption, bribes, mordidas, tips – Doing Business in Mexico

Don Gringo says “Mexico possibly has one of the best governments anyone could buy. And cheap, too.” Catemaco News and Commentary

Bernard Wasow writes in the Globalist “It is no secret that the at law enforcement in Mexico is a “for-profit” business.” Greasing Palms: Corruption in Mexico.

Wide Angle presents a Corruption Chart; How big is Mexico’s problem. Which gives a great state by state overview and comparison of corruption levels in Mexico.

A quote from the page: “According to anti-corruption czar Francisco Barrio, the cost of corruption by government officials and by everyday Mexicans surpassed the amount budgeted for education by more than three percentage points — some 9.5 percent of Mexico’s GDP of $550 billion. Recent studies by the World Economic Forum, an international organization that works to improve worldwide economic conditions, found that the business environment such as rule of law, transparency and corruption were disincentives for foreign investment in Mexico. Corruption, which is often described as a tax, adds to the cost of doing business. The Opacity Index, a study conducted by Pricewaterhouse Coopers, found that Mexico lost $8.5 billion in foreign direct investments in 1999 due to corruption and other suspect legal or economic practices.”

Corruption exists in every country in the world, in politics, in business, in everyday life. In some countries it’s more sophisticated or hidden, in others it’s obvious and required in order to get things done. Mexico is no exception.

People seem to ignore corruption in their own countries, and react with shock and anger to corruption in others.

Depending on where you live in Mexico, what you are trying to do, and who you are dealing with, your experience with corruption and bribery will not echo anyone else.

Evaluation of Mexico, China, Brazil, India or any other country as a potential business location or market should include an analysis of how corruption will threaten and affect your operations, efficiency and bottom line.

Your organization should have a clear understanding of the situation and create a set of rules governing how to deal with the reality and any situations that might arise.

You have to ask and answer the question, “do I want my organization to participate and be involved in corruption and bribery, and at what levels”?

Get advice and information from local businesspeople and consultants on the reality of corruption and bribery. Learn how the culture deals with it, detects it and punishes it before you commit to a strategy, path or action plan.

Related Links

How to do business in Mexico, Parts 1 – 28

Tipping guidelines for Mexico

Doing Business in Mexico – cultural tips

World Corruption Perception Index – 2006

Patience chaos and doing business in Mexico





Questions – Answers, Doing business in Mexico

14 11 2006

Have any questions about how to do business in Mexico?

Any specific problems or dilemmas related to doing business in Mexico?

Questions about the business culture in Mexico or Mexican culture in general?

Would you like to know more about a specific theme related to Mexican business?

Need references or information about organizations, people or associations in Mexico?

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Official government websites of the 32 Mexican States 

The definitive dialing guide for calling Mexico

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How to speed up business decisions in Mexico

13 11 2006

When doing business in Mexico, one of the fundamental complaints I hear from non-Mexican business people is the speed at which business in transacted.

They say there are 5 speeds to the Mexican economy, I believe they also apply to negotiations in Mexico.

1. Slow.

2. Slower.

3. Stalled.

4. Going in reverse.

5. Dead.

It can be quite frustrating, but it is part of Mexican business culture.

There are several options available that may help speed up the decision-making process in Mexico.

  • Make certain you are both working for the same goal. Write it down, discuss it, and determine that everyone is seeking the same thing. There should not be any hidden agendas.
  • Set fixed and specific dates when the data or information must be available or the decision will be made. Get personal commitments from the other participants. Don’t settle for vague answers, get them to agree in public to bring the specific data or make the decision on a specific date. Personal, not institutional responsibility.
  • Does everyone have all the information required to make the decision? Write down what is missing and assign responsible parties and dates for completion.
  • Follow-up with phone calls and written communication and verify that everything is running on schedule. You will have to dedicate more time to “motivating” or “prodding” than you are used to in your own country.
  • Don’t get angry. If there is no decision it is because of a reason you don’t understand or hasn’t been verbalized. Anger is seen as threatening, and not part of a good relationship, it will hurt you more than help you.
  • Be patient. It always takes longer than you think it will.
  • Keep up the communications, in fact increase them. Contact all the team members involved, try and discuss the project or decision informally (outside of the office or work environment).
  • It might be the money. When everything looks perfect, and still no decision, it might be due to money (or lack of it). Try and discuss this privately with the head decision-maker.
  • It might be the risk or control involved. Bring the subject out in the open and discuss the risks and control issues involved for both sides. This is best done informally with the team members, one on one.
  • It might be NO. Mexicans do not like to say no or give bad news in certain situations. They believe it is impolite, and many times will not respond or will allow the situation to continue until it fades away without a “yes or no” decision being made.

Related Links

Patience Chaos and doing business in Mexico

Doing Business in Mexico – cultural tips

How to negotiate with Mexican business people

How to do business in Mexico