Looking for New? It’s in another country

21 06 2007

Comments from yesterday’s post New is a requirement got me thinking about how living and working in another country moves your “comfort zone” and exposes you to lots of New.

There is a tendency to forget that this New soon becomes part of our routine and becomes integrated in our system of evaluation and processing of experiences.

Working internationally has been my biggest source of New for the past 30+ years in my personal and professional life.

It invigorates and challenges me.

It’s not always fun, or easy.

Living and working internationally has taught me:

  • Patience. It always takes more time than you think.
  • To listen before acting, reacting or responding.
  • To be humble. I don’t know it all, there is always something else to learn in order to understand.
  • To deal with frustration. When it’s not happening just the way you want it to, it means there is a different way to do it, find the alternative or live with the current situation, stop the whining and complaining.
  • New ways to solve problems. Not everyone culture approaches or attacks a problem the same way.
  • To analyze several solutions before making a final decision. What’s right at home may be 100% wrong in your current situation.
  • Most people are honest, fair and open, however being a strange face in a strange land brings out a certain criminal element that may find you irresistible (especially in the transportation sector).
  • People express themselves and their true feelings very differently, especially when it comes to solving conflicts.
  • Food ingredients and table manners are wildly different and can create physical and/or psychological reactions that were previously unknown to me.
  • There is no “right” way to live, solve problems or compete.
  • Politics and religion can be discussed, but should never be debated. Never.
  • Travel is not glamorous, restful, or easy. Takes a great deal of preparation, adaptation and improvisation to make it work.
  • Hospitality, manners and paying attention to detail are incredible important in making and maintaining relationships (host and guest).
  • Guides are important. These may be other business people, local residents, books or information about the people, place and culture. Learn, learn, learn and ask lots of questions, it pays off.
  • To be fair. Make deals and agreements as if you are going to be working with that company or individual for the next 20 years.
  • To see the “Big Picture”. Relationships, government policies, customs and cultural differences all interact and I begin to see larger issues being affected by my smaller decisions and preoccupations.

What about you?

What New did you confront, discover, embrace, enjoy or hate while living or working in another country?

Related Links

New is a requirement

International business tips

Cultural Misunderstanding- it can happen to you

Create great international business relationships

Great International Business Trip Results

16 Essential questions – the international business traveller’s quiz






Difference between a global, transnational, international and multinational company

18 06 2007

We tend to read the following terms and think they refer to any company doing business in another country.

  • Multinational
  • International
  • Transnational
  • Global

Andrew Hines over at BNET has brief and clear definitions of each of these terms, Get your international business terms right.

Each term is distinct and has a specific meaning which define the scope and degree of interaction with their operations outside of their “home” country.

  • International companies are importers and exporters, they have no investment outside of their home country.
  • Multinational companies have investment in other countries, but do not have coordinated product offerings in each country. More focused on adapting their products and service to each individual local market.
  • Global companies have invested and are present in many countries. They market their products through the use of the same coordinated image/brand in all markets. Generally one corporate office that is responsible for global strategy. Emphasis on volume, cost management and efficiency.
  • Transnational companies are much more complex organizations. They have invested in foreign operations, have a central corporate facility but give decision-making, R&D and marketing powers to each individual foreign market.

Andrews’s advice is if in doubt about the right term to use, try the generic term “international business”.

Related Links

Get your international business terms right

BNET





Discount and Budget Airlines in Mexico

16 01 2007

Low cost and budget airlines are finding their way to Mexico.

These new airlines are offering international flights and national flights between intermediate cities in Mexico previously only accessible through bus lines or at much higher prices via the full service airlines.

The budget minded vacation or business traveller should check out the schedules and prices of these airlines next time you are travelling in and around Mexico.

Aero California

Aladia

Alma de Mexico

America West

ATA

A Volar

Aviacsa

Azteca

Click Mexicana

Frontier

InterJet

Jet Blue

MagniCharters

Mexus Airlines

Spirit

Ted

Viva Aerobus

Volaris

Related Links

Attitude Travel Latin America Low Cost Airlines

Discount Airlines in Mexico

How to call Mexico from the US

Airport Codes for Mexico





Mexican politics – what business people should know

22 11 2006

In order to begin to understand Mexican politics (an impossible task), it’s important to learn some fundamentals of the political system in Mexico.

  • There is no re-election for political officials for the same post in Mexico. Current office holders can sit-out a term and run again for the same office, or they can run for another political post.
  • The political parties control the selection of party candidates who run for office, at Federal, State and local levels. Political parties, and their leaders are very important.
  • In order to be remain in politics one must please both the party and the electorate.
  • The term for the President of Mexico is for 6 years, with no re-election.
  • The term for State Governor is 6 years, with no re-election.
  • The term for Senators is 6 years, with no re-election for a consecutive term.
  • The term for the Camara de Diputados (similar to the House of Representatives in the US) is 3 years, with no re-election for a consecutive term.
  • The term for local mayor is 3 years with no re-election for a consecutive term.
  • The term for State representatives and local elected positions is normally 3 years, with no re-election for a consecutive term.
  • Changes in the Mayor, Governor or President, cause major reshuffling of bureaucrats and administrative officials. This causes a slowdown or “unofficial” shutdown of some government offices between the election date and the date of the new administration start-up.
  • The lack of re-election encourages and favors the current politicians and parties in power to seek out projects with short term visible benefits. They are pushed to show successes, infrastructure projects or other tangible benefits during their term of office in order to get promoted and elected to future political posts.
  • In the Mexican states with stable, well defined political party tendencies and majorities, there is more focus on medium and long term projects and planning as the benefits can be attributed to the party.
  • If selling a long term project to the government, it should include short term benefits, or tangible results, so that the politicians involved can claim credit.
  • Never try and initiate the sale or negotiation of a major project to the State government during the last 6 months or year of a Governors term. It will be stalled, and you will have to “resell” it to the new administration.
  • Get to know as many local and State and Federal political officials as possible, in 3 to 6 years they are all sitting in different positions of power and influence in the government.

Related Links

How to do business in Mexico, Politics and Political Parties

How to speed up business decisions in Mexico

Patience, chaos and doing business in Mexico

Official websites of the Mexican states

Best States for business in Mexico – World Bank Report 2007





How to tell if your Mexican banknotes are counterfeit

18 11 2006

How to tell if your Mexican banknotes are counterfeit.

The handling of foreign currency creates a whole new set of challenges for the business or vacation traveller.

The Bank of Mexico has a webpage dedicated to explaining the security features of the Mexican coins and banknotes so you don’t get bamboozled. Verifying Mexican banknote authenticity

Learn about the security features in Mexican banknotes to eliminate the possibility of receiving “funny money” during your travels.

Security features in manufactured Mexican banknotes – A quick chart to help identify the security features in the current banknotes in circulation in Mexico.

Security features in the 20 Peso polymer banknote

Security features in the 50 Peso paper banknote

Security features in the 100 Peso banknote

Security features in the 200 Peso banknote

Security features in the 500 Peso banknote

Security features in the 1000 Peso banknote

If you believe you have counterfeit Mexican currency, bring it to the attention of a Mexican bank for verification. If the banknote is counterfeit you will not be reimbursed for it’s value, but you might avoid going to jail. Passing counterfeit currency is illegal in Mexico.

The US Department of State Consular information sheet for Mexico states A number of Americans have been arrested for passing on counterfeit currency they had earlier received in change. If you receive what you believe to be a counterfeit bank note, bring it to the attention of Mexican law enforcement.”

Related Links

Mexican currency, monetary policy and financial systems – BANXICO

Banco de Mexico – BANXICO – Bank of Mexico





Questions – Answers, Doing business in Mexico

14 11 2006

Have any questions about how to do business in Mexico?

Any specific problems or dilemmas related to doing business in Mexico?

Questions about the business culture in Mexico or Mexican culture in general?

Would you like to know more about a specific theme related to Mexican business?

Need references or information about organizations, people or associations in Mexico?

Send your questions to me at   lee.iwan  at  gmail.com
or post a comment here.

Related Links

How to do business in Mexico

Official government websites of the 32 Mexican States 

The definitive dialing guide for calling Mexico

Shorten your learning curve about Mexico

Business South of the Border





How to speed up business decisions in Mexico

13 11 2006

When doing business in Mexico, one of the fundamental complaints I hear from non-Mexican business people is the speed at which business in transacted.

They say there are 5 speeds to the Mexican economy, I believe they also apply to negotiations in Mexico.

1. Slow.

2. Slower.

3. Stalled.

4. Going in reverse.

5. Dead.

It can be quite frustrating, but it is part of Mexican business culture.

There are several options available that may help speed up the decision-making process in Mexico.

  • Make certain you are both working for the same goal. Write it down, discuss it, and determine that everyone is seeking the same thing. There should not be any hidden agendas.
  • Set fixed and specific dates when the data or information must be available or the decision will be made. Get personal commitments from the other participants. Don’t settle for vague answers, get them to agree in public to bring the specific data or make the decision on a specific date. Personal, not institutional responsibility.
  • Does everyone have all the information required to make the decision? Write down what is missing and assign responsible parties and dates for completion.
  • Follow-up with phone calls and written communication and verify that everything is running on schedule. You will have to dedicate more time to “motivating” or “prodding” than you are used to in your own country.
  • Don’t get angry. If there is no decision it is because of a reason you don’t understand or hasn’t been verbalized. Anger is seen as threatening, and not part of a good relationship, it will hurt you more than help you.
  • Be patient. It always takes longer than you think it will.
  • Keep up the communications, in fact increase them. Contact all the team members involved, try and discuss the project or decision informally (outside of the office or work environment).
  • It might be the money. When everything looks perfect, and still no decision, it might be due to money (or lack of it). Try and discuss this privately with the head decision-maker.
  • It might be the risk or control involved. Bring the subject out in the open and discuss the risks and control issues involved for both sides. This is best done informally with the team members, one on one.
  • It might be NO. Mexicans do not like to say no or give bad news in certain situations. They believe it is impolite, and many times will not respond or will allow the situation to continue until it fades away without a “yes or no” decision being made.

Related Links

Patience Chaos and doing business in Mexico

Doing Business in Mexico – cultural tips

How to negotiate with Mexican business people

How to do business in Mexico





Corruption, bribes, mordidas, tips – Doing business in Mexico

7 11 2006

There are perceptions and realities associated with bribery and corruption when doing business in Mexico.

Corruption, bribery, “mordidas” (translated as “bites”, but are actually bribes) and tips are part of Mexico and the foreigner’s perception of Mexico.

It’s a difficult subject to address because it involves ethical and moral decisions for the foreign visitor or business person. What is culturally OK in Mexico, may be seen as immoral and corrupt by an individual from another country.

Historically, corruption in Mexico is blamed upon the Spanish conquistadors. While corruption no doubt existed prior to the Spanish conquest, they certainly did institutionalize it in government and throughout the Mexican (and Latin American) culture.

Today corruption, bribery and tipping occur at all levels of Mexican society and at many different degrees. For one reason or another it has become part of daily life. Most of it involves small sums of money, and is thought of as tipping and not as a bribe.

In fact, to eliminate corruption in Mexico overnight is unrealistic and would probably result in chaos. As some Mexican observers have noted, “La mordida” is the grease that makes the system work.

All of the following might occur in Mexico. Which of the following are acts of corruption or bribery? Which are totally unethical, somewhat unethical, and no big deal? Which of these events occurs in your country ?

  • The garbage collectors come by every 2 weeks, rings the doorbell and ask for money for a soft drink, US $1 or $2.
  • While waiting in a long line, someone comes up to you and asks if you would like to avoid the line and be attended right away. It will cost US $ 5 to US $ 10, and save you 2 hours.
  • Your application for a permit/license has been in the government office for several weeks, and no one seems to be able to tell you what is wrong. The secretary asks if you would like to buy a raffle ticket for some organization. After buying the ticket the application suddenly appears.
  • You visit a local political leader and take him to dinner and a theater event to discuss your project.
  • At holiday time, you send gifts to politicians, suppliers and business associates.
  • Your daughter copies exam answers from another student at school.
  • The police stop you for a traffic violation (which may or may not have occurred). They suggest that for US $ 20 or $ 50 you can make it disappear, and you’ll be on your way in 5 minutes.
  • You need government agency approvals for your business project. In order to make sure everything is done correctly, you hire an official in the department as a consultant.
  • You require a zoning change on a piece of land, you invite a government official to participate as an investor in the project, or perhaps give him some shares.
  • Your son or daughter wants to get into a nightclub, the doorman says no. They give him US $ 5 and walk right in.
  • A city inspector finds code violations in your restaurant. A call to a family member, who knows someone, who knows someone, results in the violations being revoked.
  • A drug enforcement agent receives a phone call that tells him to choose between accepting USD $ 20,000 payment this year to let a drug shipment go by unharmed or to have his children shot.
  • Your immigration papers are not quite right. There is a document missing. You are able to convince the official (though words and tears) to “overlook” the situation, no money is exchanged.

Can you live and work in Mexico and not pay bribes? Yes. (I’m lived and worked in Mexico over the past 14 years and have never paid a “mordida” in my private or business life.)

Are bribes necessary for doing business in Mexico? I think it depends on the circumstances. Most business can be done without them. It depends on you, and your evaluation of the situation. There must be certain areas where influence peddling, and “mordidas” are an integral part of the business, and other areas where it’s not required in the least. This is not unique to Mexico.

All Mexican local, state and federal governments and government agencies are not corrupt. In fact, in the past 10 years there have been great advances in transparency in government, including guarantees for the time involved in processing applications and permissions.

Mexican federal public policy and local and state governments have been actively reducing and eliminating institutionalized corruption and penalizing government workers involved in illegal acts. There is still a long way to go before it’s completely eliminated, but there has been a noticeable change in many areas.

Mexico’s poverty, unequal distribution of wealth, history and culture make it difficult to eradicate corruption overnight. Mexico is a country with many laws, but they are not well enforced. It’s similar to the temptation one might feel on the lonely country road at 3:00 AM and confronting a red light…..do you stop…or run through it?

You should develop and hold firm to your own ethical and moral principals in order to live and do business in Mexico. If you don’t do it at home, why would you do it in Mexico?

Your company should have a clear policy about corruption and bribery, and hold to it when doing business in Mexico, or internationally.

If you have any personal experiences or observations about corruption, bribery, mordidas and doing business in Mexico, please write me or comment here.
Related Links

How to do business in Mexico, Parts 1 – 28

Tipping guidelines for Mexico

Doing Business in Mexico – cultural tips

World Corruption Perception Index – 2006

Patience chaos and doing business in Mexico





The definitive guide on how to dial to Mexico

4 11 2006

Starting today, November 4, 2006 there are changes on how to dial to cellular phones in Mexico.

The program called “El que llama paga”, which means “whoever calls, pays for the call”, allows you to call any cellular phone in Mexico and the recipient of the call does not have to pay. Previously the cost of the call was shared between both parties.

If calling Mexico from out of the country (International long distance):

  • To a fixed landline phone: the exit code of the country (in the USA – “011″) + 52 + area code + telephone number
  • To a Mexican cellular phone: the exit code of the country (in the USA – “011″) + 52 + 1 + area code + telephone number

If in Mexico, calling from a fixed landline phone to a Mexican cellular phone

  • To a cellular phone in the same city: 044 + area code + telephone number
  • To a cellular phone in another city: 045 + area code + telephone number
  • To a Nextel of the same city: telephone number
  • To a Nextel of another city: 01 + area code + telephone number
  • From a fixed landline that is NOT Telmex to a cellular phone of another city:  01 + area code + telephone number

If in Mexico, dialing from a cellular phone

  • To a fixed landline in the same city: telephone number
  • To a fixed landline in another city: 01 + area code + telephone number
  • To a cellular telephone in the same city: area code + telephone number
  • To a cellular telephone in another city: 045 + area code + telephone number
  • To a NEXTEL: telephone number
  • To a NEXTEL in another city: 01 + area code + telephone number

Related Links

How to call Mexico from the USA

Changes for dialing long distance to cellular phones in Mexico





Use of business titles in Mexico – Doing Business in Mexico

3 11 2006

The use of business titles in Mexican business life is important.

Most people with professional degrees are addressed using their professional title. This is especially true in written communication. Failure to do so can be seen as lack of education and offensive.

Until you get to know a person, always use the professional title or full name, never address them by their first name until it is clear that they are comfortable with this.

You can ask how they wish to be addressed if unsure. It’s better to make a mistake on the side of formality.

Some titles are general, and when in doubt regarding the professional title, you should use these:

  • Joven – refers to any young man from birth to adolescent.
  • Señor (Sr.) - refers to any male older than an adolescent.
  • Don – a term of great respect used to recognize older males.
  • Señorita (Srta.) – refers to any unmarried female. Once a woman is above a certain age, she is referred to as Señora, even if unmarried.
  • Señora (Sra.) - refers to any married or widowed woman.
  • Doña – a term of great respect used to recognize older females.

Professional titles

  • Doctor (Dr.) masculine, or Doctora (Dra.) feminine – Refers to anyone with a PhD. or Medical Doctors degree.
  • Licenciado (Lic.) masculine, or Licenciada (Lic.) feminine – refers to anyone with a law degree (most common usage) or Bachelor’s Degree.
  • Contador Publico (C.P.) – refers to anyone with a public accounting degree.
  • Ingeniero (Ing.) – refers to someone with an engineering degree.
  • Arquitecto (Arq.) - Refers to anyone with an arquitectural degree.
  • Diputado (Dip.) masculine, or Diputada (Dip.) feminine – refers to a publicly elected official equivalent to Federal, State or Local representative in the USA.

Related Links

Doing Business in Mexico – Cultural Tips

Patience, Chaos and Doing Business in Mexico

How to do business in Mexico

Criticism – how to do business in Mexico

Meeting people in Mexico

How to negotiate with Mexican business people

How to call Mexico from the USA





Doing Business in Mexico – cultural tips

1 11 2006

When doing business in Mexico you are very likely to see some, or all, of the following during a business trip. It’s part of the Mexican business and social culture.

  • Late arrival for meetings by participants. This might be up to 30 to 45 minutes late.
  • Cancellations at the last minute.
  • Changes in agreed upon plans and agendas.
  • Long lunches or dinners, where business talk is not the major theme.
  • Meetings that seem to go on for a long time before coming to the business issue.
  • People will gesture and use their hands a great deal while speaking.
  • There will be a degree of emotion in business discussions and presentations.
  • People will be very formal and polite.
  • People will sit very close to you when speaking, and often touch your arm or shoulder while talking.
  • Your Mexican partners will not be forth coming and explicit regarding bad news.
  • You will not hear the word NO a lot.
  • Deadlines may not be met for reasons that you don’t understand or don’t believe.
  • Until you establish a social relationship with your Mexican business partners, your business discussions will seem very vague, cold and unsatisfying.
  • Decision-making may be extremely swift or excruciatingly slow. You never will know why.
  • Dinners, parties, weddings and social gatherings last for hours. There is no such thing as a 2 hour cocktail party.
  • You will be encouraged to eat everything, drink plenty and enjoy yourself while in Mexico. Failure to do this is seen as a refusal of hospitality or a sign that you are not comfortable in Mexico or with your hosts.
  • In a social gathering the men will tend to congregate in one part of the room or table and the women in the other.

 

Related Links

 

Patience, Chaos and Doing Business in Mexico

How to do business in Mexico

Criticism – how to do business in Mexico

Meeting people in Mexico

How to negotiate with Mexican business people

How to call Mexico from the USA

Great International Business Trip Results

16 Essential questions – the international business traveller’s quiz





International Business – cultural mistakes

31 10 2006

Good advice for international travellers, on how to avoid being seen as the “ugly American”.   Are you the ugly American by Erin Richards, Budget Travel.

Remember that every action, comment, reaction, criticism and gesture is being watched and evaluated by your hosts, counterparts and clients when you are in their country.

Look for and work to find the similarities in your cultures and interests.

Humility and and stopping to think before acting will go a long way toward improving your relationships and international cultural and social skills.

Related Links

Cultural Misunderstanding- it can happen to you

International Business Tips

Great International Business Trip Results

16 Essential questions – the international business traveller’s quiz

Lessons in international business

Stereotypes and global business

Are you the ugly American





Lessons in international business – negotiations

17 10 2006

Observations on how to create trust, effective meetings and excellent negotiations with overseas customers, suppliers and partners.

  • Whenever you are involved in international negotiations or global meetings keep in mind that you might be working with the same person for the next 10 – 20 years.
  • Negotiations should be open and straightforward.  Hidden agendas will eventually be discovered and make the next meeting very difficult.
  • Negotiations should involve creating value for both parties.
  • Meetings are important moments where trust is being built and confirmed.  Be honest and clear about your desires.
  • Never agree to something you cannot deliver or perform.
  • Listen, understand and evaluate what your partner is requesting.   What are they saying, and what does it mean.
  • Be certain of what you are negotiating and agreeing to.  If not 100% sure, stop and request clarification.
  • Prepare for the meeting several weeks before it happens.  Refresh and add information weekly.  When you reach the meeting, you will be in control of the information and feel comfortable during the talks.
  • At the end of the meeting, write down the most important points or agreements, with names and dates, and have it signed by those present.  This little tip will save lots of time and trouble for everyone involved.
  • Any agreement must have 100% follow-through.  If for any reason problems arise in the follow-through, immediately contact and communicate the situation to your partner.

Related Links

How to negotiate with Mexican business people

Great international business trip results





Great International Business Trip Results

16 10 2006

In any international relationship communication and understanding are critical for success.

Problems created by; language, stereotypes, misinformation, lack of information, and cultural misunderstandings combine with normal business problems to create a complicated scenario for anyone involved in international relationships and global business.

Prepare your international meetings and business presentations using the following questions as a guide to organize your ideas and focus on actions that will produce positive results for everyone involved.

6 Questions – Create Great International Business Trip Results

  1. What does this organization know about me, my company and my country?
  2. What do they think they know about me?
  3. What can I tell them that they do not know?
  4. What do I know about my international partner, culture and country?
  5. What do I think I know about this business, culture and country?
  6. What can they tell me that I do not know?

1. What does this organization know about me and my company. When you walk in the room an opinion has already been formed about you, your organization, and your ability to perform in the future. These ideas are based upon facts, information and past experience.

  • What has been the history of our relationship in their country?
  • Who has been involved in our mutual business, and why?
  • What promises have been made and kept by both?
  • What promises have been made and not delivered upon?
  • What have the major problems and success been in the past?
  • Press and media, our organizations promotional material.

2. What do they think they know about me. Clarifying the unknowns or presumed realities in a relationship is crucial to success. These ideas may be very damaging and limit your ability to trust one another. What stereotypical behaviour can you avoid or prevent? What can you clarify or refute through information or actions?

  • Behaviour and reacts based upon past experience with your organization.
  • Rumour and innuendo, press and media reports.
  • Negotiation styles.
  • Business objectives.
  • Behaviour, goals and methods of doing business based upon country and cultural stereotypes.

3. What can I tell them that they do not know. Today’s business world requires trust, information and solutions. Reinforcing your need to work with your international partner, providing important information or solutions, and clarifying misunderstandings can only help the relationship.

  • Clarify or destroy cultural stereotypes.
  • Clarify business objectives and why they are important in order to reach these objectives.
  • Provide solutions and alternatives to existing situations and challenges.
  • Provide information of value for their business and strategy.
  • Clearly identify current or potential business problems.
  • Predict and have answers ready for their questions.

4. What do I know about my International partner, culture and country? What do I know is true and not innuendo or interpretation? The numbers, facts, information, agreements and past performance history of the business. Information about the country and the business culture.

5. What do I think I know about this business, culture and country? What preconceived ideas and stereotypes are you working with? What are you assuming and what has been proven?

6. What can they tell me that I do not know? What questions do you need to ask in order to verify information or create plans. What pieces of your information puzzle are missing? This is the time to get your questions answered, what are they?

Related Links

Cultural misunderstanding it can happen to you

Stereotypes and global business

Create great international business relationships

16 Essential questions – the international business traveller’s quiz

Lessons in international business





Changes – dialing long distance to a cellular phone in Mexico

12 10 2006

New changes take effect for some cellular phone companies in Mexico on November 4, 2006.

The program is called “El Que Llama Paga Nacional”, which loosely translated means “Whoever Calls, Pays for the Call In Mexico”. Previously a long distance call to a cellular phone was shared between the caller and the receiver of the call.

New long distance dialing codes (after November 4, 2006) from “regular” landline phone to a cellular phone:

If calling from Mexico, long distance to a Mexican cell phone:
045-Area Code – Telephone number
(the old code was 01-Area Code-Telephone number)

If calling from other countries to a Mexican cell phone: 52-1-Area Code- Telephone number (old code was 52-Area Code- Telephone number)

This 045 prefix applies to calls to cellular phones using Telmex, Telefonos del Noroeste, Telcel, Iusacell, Iusatel, Telefonica, Baja Celular, Telefonia Celular del Norte, Portatel del Sureste, Telecomunicaciones del Golfo and Unefon service. This represents 90% of the cellular phone users in Mexico.

The person on the cellular phone receiving the call will not be charged, however the person making the call from the landline phone will be charged approximately $ 3.00 Mexican pesos per minute (an increase of 300% from the current rate). The rates are still being negotiated between the companies and final results should be available from Cofetel in the next week.

The following companies have not signed the agreement: Axtel, Avantel, Alestra and Maxcom. Dialing to cellular phones using these suppliers will remain the same (01-Area Code- Telephone number) and the costs are shared between the person dialing and the person receiving the call.

Related Links

Cofetel

El Que Llama Paga Nacional (pdf)

How to call Mexico from the USA





Lessons in international business

10 10 2006

The most difficult part of doing business overseas will occur when you have to explain your country’s politics and culture, and provide answers on why you do things the way you do.

Related Links

Cultural misunderstanding it can happen to you

Stereotypes and global business

International business traveller, ambassador, explorer, map-maker





Travel information – Guanajuato, Mexico

28 09 2006

Life is not all about work.  When on business trips to Mexico, do some research about your destination and nearby cities.  Ask your hosts to assist with transportation or a guide, and visit the area.  It will help you understand the country, and greatly increase your enthusiasm for doing business in Mexico.

If you are in Leon or Irapuato for business, make sure you get out to see Guanajuato City.

The New York Times has a piece on the city of Guanajuato in the state of Guanajuato, Mexico in their T-Style Magazine: Travel Section.   The City that Silver Built

Quite a different experience from the border towns and beach resorts that Mexico is famous for.  Guanajuato city is located in the geographical center of Mexico, 30 minutes away from Leon, the largest city in the state of Guanajuato.

The city of Guanajuato (located in the state of Guanajuato) is home to the International Cervantino Arts Festival (Festival Internacional Cervantino, FIC).  This year the dates of the Festival are October 4 – October 22, 2006.

Related Links

The City that Silver Built: New York Times

Guanajuato Capital 

Travel by Mexico:  Guanajuato

Festival Internacional Cervantino 2006 





Airport codes for Mexico

21 09 2006

An alphabetical  listing, by city, of the 3 digit airport codes for Mexico.

  • AJS   Abreojos
  • ACA  Acapulco Alvarez International
  • AGU  Aguascalientes
  • XAL  Alamos
  • AZG  Apatzingan
  • BHL  Bahia de los Angeles
  • CPE  Campeche International
  • CNA  Cananea
  • CUN  Cancun
  • CTM  Chetumal
  • CUU  Chihuahua Villalobos
  • ACN  Ciudad Acuna International
  • CUA  Ciudad Constitucion
  • CME  Ciudad del Carmen
  • CJS  Ciudad Juarez International
  • MMC  Ciudad Mante
  • CEN  Ciudad Obregon
  • CVM Ciudad Victoria
  • CLQ  Colima
  • CZM  Cozumel Municipal
  • STZ  Cristobl Casas
  • CUL  Culiacan Bachiguala
  • DGO  Durango Victoria
  • ESE  Ensenada
  • GDL  Guadalajara Miguel Hidalgo
  • GYM  Guaymas Yanez
  • GUB  Guerrero Negro
  • HMO  Hermosillo P. Garcia
  • HUX  Huatulco B. Huatulco
  • ISJ  Isla Mujeres
  • ZIH  Ixtapa / Zihuatanejo International
  • IZT  Ixtepec
  • JAL  Jalapa
  • LAP  La Paz Leon
  • LZC  Lazaro Cardenas
  • BJX  Leon / Guanajuato del Bajio
  • LTO  Loreto
  • SJD  Los Cabos
  • LMM  Los Mochis Federal
  • ZLO  Manzanillo
  • MAM  Matamoros
  • MZT  Mazatlan Buelna
  • MID  Merida Rejon
  • MXL  Mexicali
  • AZP  Mexico City Atizapan
  • MEX  Mexico City Juarez International
  • TLC  Mexico City Morelos
  • NLU  Mexico City Santa Lucia
  • MTT  Minatitlan
  • LOV  Monclova
  • NTR  Monterrey Aeropuerto del Norte
  • MTY  Monterrey Escobedo
  • MLM  Morelia
  • MUG  Mulege
  • NOG  Nogales
  • NCG  Nueva Casas Grandes
  • NLD  Nuevo Laredo International
  • OAX  Oaxaca Xoxocotlan
  • PQM  Palenque
  • PDS  Piedras Negras
  • PNO  Pinotepa Nacional
  • PCM  Playa del Carmen
  • PUH Pochutla
  • PAZ  Poza Rica Tajin
  • PBC  Puebla Huejotsngo
  • PXM  Puerto Escondido
  • PJZ  Puerto Juarez
  • PPE  Puerto Penasco
  • PVR  Puerto Vallarta Ordaz
  • PCV  Punta Chivato
  • PCO  Punta Colorada
  • QRO  Queretaro
  • REX  Reynosa Blanco
  • SCX  Salina Cruz
  • SLW  Saltillo
  • SFH  San Felipe
  • SGM  San Ignacio
  • SLP  San Luis Potosi
  • UAC  San Luis Rio Colorado
  • SNQ  San Quintin
  • SRL  Santa Rosalia
  • TAM  Tampico Javier
  • TSL  Tamuin
  • TAP  Tapachula International
  • TCN  Tehuacan
  • TPQ  Tepic
  • TIJ  Tijuana
  • TZM  Tizimin
  • TRC  Torreon Sarabia
  • TUY  Tulum
  • TGZ  Tuxtla Gutierrrez Llano
  • UPN  Uruapan
  • VER  Veracruz
  • VIB  Villa Constitucion
  • VSA  Villahermosa C.R. Perez
  • ZCL  Zacatecas la Calera
  • ZMM  Zamora




Business in Mexico, conversation themes

15 09 2006

When going to Mexico for business, be prepared for conversations. Mexicans are social people. They love to gather in groups and socialize. You can be assured of plenty of conversations during your visit.

Most business meetings and business dinners will involve a great deal of conversation of off-topic ideas before getting to business. Your ability to participate and keep the conversation moving is an important part of creating trust and the bonds required for doing business successfully in Mexico.

What topics are of general interest in Mexico?

Be cautious about introducing your personal opinions about politics and religion. Asking others to explain the current situation, so that you can understand it, is a safe way to venture into themes related to politics and economics.

Currently (September 2006) the following themes are sure to provoke conversations, discussions and opinions when in Mexico.

  • The recent Mexican presidential elections. Predictions for the future, scenarios, how it will might affect business and Mexico.
  • Your industry or business sector. Any international or national news, information, gossip, trends or tendencies related to your business sector.
  • Infrastructure projects in the city or state where you are visiting
  • China and it’s impact on the Mexican economy
  • Children and family
  • News or current events that can be found on the front page of the local or national newspaper
  • Recommendations on when and where to vacation in Mexico

Related Links

Create great international relationships

Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico





Create great international business relationships

14 09 2006

Working with individuals and ideas from cultures different from our own is complex, and filled with opportunities to misunderstand and offend everyone involved. It requires time to develop trust and understanding for all the players involved.

Take the time to learn how and why business is done in the country. Don’t judge the results based upon your culture and your country’s standards.

There is nothing more damaging to an international relationship than criticism based upon a lack of understanding. You must learn before you attempt to teach new ideas, strategies and procedures.

When doing business in Mexico remember that no matter what you feel or believe about your company’s products or procedures, Mexicans know their market and people better than you do. They know the correct business etiquette and the “invisible” cultural nuances that are required in order to do business in Mexico.

If you enter into business in Mexico with the idea that you are going to “teach the Mexicans how business is really done” I am confident you will suffer some serious problems.

Pushing procedures and business strategies into Mexico will surely cause divisions, it can turn into an “us versus them” situation for employees and customers.

I recommend that your focus be on learning and understanding how business in currently done in Mexico, and why. Once you have this knowledge, teach and explore your cultures and organizations solutions and strategies with your Mexican collaborators. I’ll bet the ideas will get modified if necessary, implemented and embraced quickly.

The creation of hybrid strategies, using elements from both cultures, will guarantee unification and understanding for everyone involved.

Before you start a revolution it’s essential to fully understand the status quo.

 

Related Links

International Business Tips

Stereotypes and global business

International business traveller – ambassador, explorer, map-maker








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