Need to know about Leon Guanajuato?

23 03 2007

Yet another Squidoo lens. This time focused on Leon Guanajuato Mexico. Happens to be the town I’ve been living in for the past 15 years.

Information about Leon Guanajuato

Leon is internationally “famous” for the shoe making and leather industry (80+% of all Mexican shoes, boots and leather goods come from Leon).

Leon is also growing due to the automotive industry and an “industrial corridor” being created between Leon and Celaya.

On top of all this, the service sector continue to expand and grow due to the population growth, the Poliforum Convention and Exhibition Center and the Poliforum Cultural Center.

Related Links

Information about Leon Guanajuato

Hotels in Leon Guanajuato

SAPICA International Footwear and Leather Goods Show

ANPIC Fair of the Americas

Mexican Footwear – How to Find Competitive Suppliers in Mexico





Top states for business in Mexico – World Bank Report 2007

17 11 2006

I highly recommend that you download and read the Doing Business in Mexico 2007 report, released on November 15, 2006.

For anyone currently doing business in Mexico, or thinking about doing business in Mexico, this is a must read.

The World Bank Group has announced that “Doing business became easier in many Mexican states in 2005-2006, according to the new Doing Business in Mexico 2007 report, released today in Mexico City. The report finds that some states compare well with the best of the world, while others need much reform to become globally competitive.” – November 15, 2006

Quick results of the top ten Mexican states based upon the factors of; starting a business, registering property, obtaining credit, and enforcing a contract include:

  1. Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes (Easiest)
  2. Guanajuato, Celaya
  3. Nuevo Leon, Monterrey
  4. Sonora, Hermosillo
  5. Campeche, Campeche
  6. Zacatecas, Zacatecas
  7. Queretaro, Queretaro
  8. Michoacan, Morelia
  9. Sinaloa, Culiacan
  10. Mexico City (Most difficult)

A full listing of all the 31 Mexican states is available in the report.

Excerpt from the report: “If you were to open a new business in Mexico City, the start-up procedures would take 27 days on average, 8 days fewer than in Shanghai. If you decided to open a business in Guanajuato or Aguascalientes, you would have to wait 12 days—only one day longer than your competitor in Amsterdam. But if you needed to take a customer to court for a simple debt default in Guanajuato, resolving the dispute would take 304 days—far longer than the 217 days it takes in Dublin,1 but significantly shorter than in Baja California Sur where it takes 581 days. These examples illustrate two patterns. First, some Mexican states compare well with the best in the world. Second, many states need much reform to become globally competitive.”

Related Links

Press release on Doing Business in Mexico 2007 (PDF, 75KB)

Doing Business in Mexico 2007 (PDF, 1.26MB)

World Bank Report – Doing Business in Mexico 2005





Questions – Answers, Doing business in Mexico

14 11 2006

Have any questions about how to do business in Mexico?

Any specific problems or dilemmas related to doing business in Mexico?

Questions about the business culture in Mexico or Mexican culture in general?

Would you like to know more about a specific theme related to Mexican business?

Need references or information about organizations, people or associations in Mexico?

Send your questions to me at   lee.iwan  at  gmail.com
or post a comment here.

Related Links

How to do business in Mexico

Official government websites of the 32 Mexican States 

The definitive dialing guide for calling Mexico

Shorten your learning curve about Mexico

Business South of the Border





Foreign direct investment in Guanajuato, Mexico

6 11 2006

The State of Guanajuato, Mexico has over 572 companies with foreign capital registered and located in the state.

The following information has been translated from an article dated November 6, 2006, published in the newspaper Correo, by Vicente Ruiz, Link.

49% of these foreign companies in Guanajuato are involved in manufacturing, and 29% are commercial operations which together represent an investment greater than 1,000,000,000 (one billion US dollars).

Due to changes in laws regarding foreign investment in Mexico (in 1993, 1995, 2001), 90% of all economic activities in Mexico are completely open to foreign participation and investment.

Mexico’s growing national economy, free trade agreements with 32 countries and geographic location provide great economic and logistics advantages to companies opening operations in Mexico.

In Guanajuato, 50% of all the foreign companies are located in the city of Leon (281), followed by Irapuato (71) Celaya (52), San Miguel Allende (31), Silao (26), San Francisco del Rincon (25), Guanajuato (19) and the rest (67) throughout the state.

Guanajuato occupies the first position for foreign investment of the all the Mexican states in the North-Central region.

Principal industries in Guanajuato that received direct foreign investment include:

  • The automotive industry received US $ 874.2 million
  • Processed food industry (concentrates, preserved products) received US $ 99.1 million
  • Manufacture of paper, cellulose and derivatives received US $ 18.9 million
  • Commerce of non-agricultural items received US $ 17.3 million
  • Chemical manufacturing received US $ 15.9 million
  • Clothing manufacturing received US $ 7.5 million
  • Textile manufacturing received US $ 5.2 million
  • Plastics manufacturing received US $ 5.4 million
  • Food products received US $ 4.8 million

Who has invested in the State of Guanajuato, Mexico:

Country…. Investment (Millions of US dollars)…… %

United States of America……..1’ 009, 214.00………..92.7

Holland………………23, 277.90………….2.1

Spain………………….18, 234.00………….1.7

Germany……………14, 267.30………….1.3

Denmark……………..4, 913.90………….0.5

Taiwan…………………4, 426.00………….0.4

Others………………..14, 549.60………….1.3

Total: USD $ 1’ 088, 882.70 (Millions)

Related Links

Aumenta inversion extrañjera en el Estado de Guanajuato: SE (Spanish)

Secretaria del Economia de Mexico (English)

State of Guanajuato webpage (English-Spanish)

Correo (Spanish)





Mexico manufacturing, US inventories and safety stock

21 10 2006

Manufacturers are returning to Mexico after “experimenting” in the Asia Pacific region. Some of the big reasons for this return are ; to reduce time to market, eliminate the financial costs of inventories in transit, lower the logistics costs, and to strengthen the supply chain by moving closer to just-in-time deliveries.

But moving to Mexico isn’t going to solve all the problems.

A September 2006 article in CFO magazine points out how US businesses are increasing safety stocks “just in case”. Delayed in the USA The article points out how supply chain disruptions are being provoked by an increasingly saturated US highway system and bottlenecks in deepwater ports and railyards.

The good news is that Mexico is close to the USA, a truckload of goods can leave any point in Mexico and arrive at the US destination in as little as 4-5 days. The railyards and new multimodal Interior Port in Guanajuato, Mexico allow manufacturers to establish production facilities in the interior of the country. Exporters can now clear customs and load the sealed container onto the rail-car at the new (2006) high capacity Customs port located in the geographic center of Mexico.

The bad news is that unless the US begins to upgrade their highway, port and rail facilities, supply chain managers in the US will be buying and storing higher levels of inventory to assure continuity of operations, “just in case”.

Related Links

Delayed in the USA – Supply Chain

Industrial and Business Parks in Mexico

AMPIP Mexican Association of Industrial and Business Parks





Travel information – Guanajuato, Mexico

28 09 2006

Life is not all about work.  When on business trips to Mexico, do some research about your destination and nearby cities.  Ask your hosts to assist with transportation or a guide, and visit the area.  It will help you understand the country, and greatly increase your enthusiasm for doing business in Mexico.

If you are in Leon or Irapuato for business, make sure you get out to see Guanajuato City.

The New York Times has a piece on the city of Guanajuato in the state of Guanajuato, Mexico in their T-Style Magazine: Travel Section.   The City that Silver Built

Quite a different experience from the border towns and beach resorts that Mexico is famous for.  Guanajuato city is located in the geographical center of Mexico, 30 minutes away from Leon, the largest city in the state of Guanajuato.

The city of Guanajuato (located in the state of Guanajuato) is home to the International Cervantino Arts Festival (Festival Internacional Cervantino, FIC).  This year the dates of the Festival are October 4 – October 22, 2006.

Related Links

The City that Silver Built: New York Times

Guanajuato Capital 

Travel by Mexico:  Guanajuato

Festival Internacional Cervantino 2006 





World Bank report – Doing Business in Mexico

23 09 2006

The World Bank has an on-line report available entitled “Doing Business in Mexico“. The study was published in December of 2005.

“Cosponsored by COFEMER, USAID, and the World Bank Group, Doing Business in Mexico is the first state-level report of the Doing Business series in Latin America. This report investigates the scope and manner of regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it.

The report covers the following thirteen Mexican cities and four areas of regulation: Starting a business, Registering property, obtaining credit and enforcing a contract.”

“When compared, Mexico City and the 12 other cities differ dramatically on the four indicators the report measures. “

The cities and regulations analyzed include: Aguascalientes, Celaya, Ciudad Juarez, Guadalajara, Monterrey, Veracruz, Merida, San Luis Potosi, Torreon, Mexico City, Tlalnepantla, Puebla, and Queretaro.

Of special note is the following comment. “The report concludes that reform is sorely needed. Much of the opportunity for improvement is in local administrative procedures, which can be changed by a governor or a mayor.”

This is very important. A governor or local mayor can make an important difference on the ease of setting up and doing business in Mexico. Seek out those states and cities with pro-active leadership. Find those areas that are investing heavily in infrastructure or have a dynamic policy focused on foreign investment and economic development.

Related Links

Doing Business in Mexico – World Bank

Doing Business in Mexico (PDF)

Press Release (PDF)





Airport codes for Mexico

21 09 2006

An alphabetical  listing, by city, of the 3 digit airport codes for Mexico.

  • AJS   Abreojos
  • ACA  Acapulco Alvarez International
  • AGU  Aguascalientes
  • XAL  Alamos
  • AZG  Apatzingan
  • BHL  Bahia de los Angeles
  • CPE  Campeche International
  • CNA  Cananea
  • CUN  Cancun
  • CTM  Chetumal
  • CUU  Chihuahua Villalobos
  • ACN  Ciudad Acuna International
  • CUA  Ciudad Constitucion
  • CME  Ciudad del Carmen
  • CJS  Ciudad Juarez International
  • MMC  Ciudad Mante
  • CEN  Ciudad Obregon
  • CVM Ciudad Victoria
  • CLQ  Colima
  • CZM  Cozumel Municipal
  • STZ  Cristobl Casas
  • CUL  Culiacan Bachiguala
  • DGO  Durango Victoria
  • ESE  Ensenada
  • GDL  Guadalajara Miguel Hidalgo
  • GYM  Guaymas Yanez
  • GUB  Guerrero Negro
  • HMO  Hermosillo P. Garcia
  • HUX  Huatulco B. Huatulco
  • ISJ  Isla Mujeres
  • ZIH  Ixtapa / Zihuatanejo International
  • IZT  Ixtepec
  • JAL  Jalapa
  • LAP  La Paz Leon
  • LZC  Lazaro Cardenas
  • BJX  Leon / Guanajuato del Bajio
  • LTO  Loreto
  • SJD  Los Cabos
  • LMM  Los Mochis Federal
  • ZLO  Manzanillo
  • MAM  Matamoros
  • MZT  Mazatlan Buelna
  • MID  Merida Rejon
  • MXL  Mexicali
  • AZP  Mexico City Atizapan
  • MEX  Mexico City Juarez International
  • TLC  Mexico City Morelos
  • NLU  Mexico City Santa Lucia
  • MTT  Minatitlan
  • LOV  Monclova
  • NTR  Monterrey Aeropuerto del Norte
  • MTY  Monterrey Escobedo
  • MLM  Morelia
  • MUG  Mulege
  • NOG  Nogales
  • NCG  Nueva Casas Grandes
  • NLD  Nuevo Laredo International
  • OAX  Oaxaca Xoxocotlan
  • PQM  Palenque
  • PDS  Piedras Negras
  • PNO  Pinotepa Nacional
  • PCM  Playa del Carmen
  • PUH Pochutla
  • PAZ  Poza Rica Tajin
  • PBC  Puebla Huejotsngo
  • PXM  Puerto Escondido
  • PJZ  Puerto Juarez
  • PPE  Puerto Penasco
  • PVR  Puerto Vallarta Ordaz
  • PCV  Punta Chivato
  • PCO  Punta Colorada
  • QRO  Queretaro
  • REX  Reynosa Blanco
  • SCX  Salina Cruz
  • SLW  Saltillo
  • SFH  San Felipe
  • SGM  San Ignacio
  • SLP  San Luis Potosi
  • UAC  San Luis Rio Colorado
  • SNQ  San Quintin
  • SRL  Santa Rosalia
  • TAM  Tampico Javier
  • TSL  Tamuin
  • TAP  Tapachula International
  • TCN  Tehuacan
  • TPQ  Tepic
  • TIJ  Tijuana
  • TZM  Tizimin
  • TRC  Torreon Sarabia
  • TUY  Tulum
  • TGZ  Tuxtla Gutierrrez Llano
  • UPN  Uruapan
  • VER  Veracruz
  • VIB  Villa Constitucion
  • VSA  Villahermosa C.R. Perez
  • ZCL  Zacatecas la Calera
  • ZMM  Zamora




Industrial and Business Parks in Mexico

20 09 2006

Looking for a “plug and play” solution for your business or factory in Mexico? Take a hard look at the advantages that Mexican industrial parks offer.

AMPIP (Mexican Association of Business and Industrial Parks) can partner with you and provide contacts and information about Mexico’s industrial and business parks. They work closely with private industry, state and local governments and real estate organizations in order to provide solutions for companies seeking to quickly and easily establish a physical presence in Mexico.

“Investment Promotion
AMPIP has become one of Mexico’s leading agencies for the promotion of foreign investment projects, thanks to its participation in national and international shows, the advertising in specialized media, the alliance with other business associations and the permanent contact with a wide network of corporations and real estate players, as well as with government officials.

Part of the promotion activities include the registration of industrial assets owned by AMPIP members in our Industrial Real Estate Promotion System, available on-line at our Internet site, apart from the printed material, such as location maps edited in conjunction with the Mexican Bank for Foreign Trade (Bancomext), which are distributed worldwide.”

There are specific and unique advantages of industrial and business parks. Saving time and money are among the biggest factors. Access to transportation, power and communication infrastructure is another. The definition of “Industrial Park” will provide some idea of the other advantages.

“What is an Industrial Park?

An industrial park is a delimited extension of land, characterized by four main aspects:

1. It is located close to transport facilities, such as hightways, airports, sea ports and railways.

2. It concentrates essential dedicated infrastructure in one location for industrial operations, such as water (including sewer lines, drainage systems), electricity (including high power supply lines), telecommunications and roads.

3. It fulfills all the prerequisites to obtain the permission from local authorities for the set up of new operations (construction, environment, etc.)

4. It has a central administration that coordinates the internal safety of assets, the maintenance of public infrastructure, the promotion of new operations and the affairs with local authorities”

For more detailed information, contact: Associacion Mexicana de Parques Industriales, Monte Camerùn 54 – 1, Colonia Lomas de Barrilaco, C.P. 11010, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, Mèxico D.F., Mexico Tel. +52 (55) 2623-2216 Fax +52 (55) 2623-2218 Email ampip@ampip.org.mx

Related Links

AMPIP Mexican Association of Business and Industrial Parks

Official Government websites of the 32 Mexican states

How to do business in Mexico

How to negotiate with Mexican business people

Mexican official (and unofficial) holidays

Tip: How to call Mexico from the US

What to dial in order to reach a cellular phone in Mexico

Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico

Meeting people in Mexico – kiss, shake hands or hug?

Before you go on your business trip to Mexico

Tipping Guidelines for Mexico





Official government websites of the 32 Mexican States

13 09 2006

Links to the Official Government Websites of the Mexican States

  • Oaxaca – Not currently available
  • Tlaxcala – Not currently available

Many of these sites have the information available in the english language. Search the entry page for links to versions in english (or ingles).

Related Links

How to do business in Mexico

How to negotiate with Mexican business people

Mexican official (and unofficial) holidays

Tip: How to call Mexico from the US

What to dial in order to reach a cellular phone in Mexico

Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico

Meeting people in Mexico – kiss, shake hands or hug?

Before you go on your business trip to Mexico

Tipping Guidelines for Mexico





Tipping guidelines for Mexico

13 09 2006

Tipping is always a concern for travellers. In Mexico, tipping is very common and expected, but there are no fixed rules for the amount of the tip. If someone is providing an extra service or favor for you, a tip would be expected and welcome.

You should always have loose change and low denomination bills with you in order to make the transaction effortless.

You should tip with the quantity that you feel comfortable with. I’ve provided some tip guidelines that should help get you started.

Basic guidelines for tipping in Mexico.

  • Restaurants – the normal tip amount is 10% -15% of the bill. There is a national value added tax (IVA) of 15% included on all restaurant bills, this is not the tip, this is a tax.  Many people leave a tip equal to the IVA, 15%, or leave 10% of the total bill that has the IVA tax included.
  • Bellhops and luggage handlers – $ 10 – $ 20 pesos per bag.
  • Hotel maids – $ 20 – $ 50 pesos per day.
  • Taxis – Depends upon the city, type of taxi (meter or negotiated price). If a metered cab, a tip would be expected perhaps 10% of the total. If the taxi is a negotiated price no tip would be expected. If a fixed rate to destination cab (for example airport cabs) a tip would be appreciated $ 10 – $ 20 pesos.
  • Gas station attendants – $5 – $ 10 pesos depending on the level of service
  • Bars – 10% of the total bill
  • Valet parking – $ 10 – $20
  • Grocery store baggers – $ 5

Related Links

How to do business in Mexico

Mexican official (and unofficial) holidays

Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico

Tip: How to call Mexico from the US





Mexican official (and unofficial) holidays

11 09 2006

Travelling to Mexico for business or pleasure?  Check the official Mexican holiday calendar to find best dates and avoid the crowds or ensure your business contacts will be there to meet you.
Mexico currently recognizes the following dates as official national holiday dates.  This means that the majority of businesses in Mexico will close, including all banks and all government agencies.

In 2006 Mexico authorized alternative dates (Mondays) for the observance of certain national holidays.  These dates are published yearly in the “Diario Oficial”.

  • January 1 – New Year’s Day
  • February 5 – Celebration of the Mexican Constitution (1917)
  • March 21 – Anniversary of the birth of Benito Juarez (1806)
  • May 1 – Labor Day
  • September 16 – Mexican Independence Day (1810)
  • November 20 – Anniversary of the Mexican Revolution (1910)
  • December 1 – Every 6 years when the power is transferred from the current president to the president elect
  • December 25 – Christmas Day

In addition there are some dates that are not official holidays, but due to local culture and customs you will find that many businesses are closed or many decision-makers are on vacation.  These include:

  • The week before Easter, especially the Thursday and Friday prior to Easter.  Holy Week (Semana Santa) is widely celebrated as a religious holiday and annual vacation time for families.  Beaches and resorts are favorite destinations.
  • May 10 – Mexican mothers day.  Always celebrated on this date, regardless of what day of the week it falls on.
  • Mid July until late August – Summer vacation time for families.  Beaches and resorts are favorite destinations.
  • Dec 12 – Day of the Celebration of the Virgin of Guadalupe.
  • December 16 until January 2 – The time of the “Posadas”, pre and post Christmas celebrations.  Many companies use these dates for annual vacations.
  • There also may be local celebrations by specific towns and cities, in order to celebrate the founding of the city or special religious events.  Businesses will normally close on these days.

Related Links

Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico

Tip:  How to call Mexico from the US

Meeting people in Mexico – kiss, shake hands or hug? 

Before you go on your business trip to Mexico

How to do business in Mexico, Parts 1 – 28 





Top 4 growth industries in Mexico

7 09 2006

I’m often asked what opportunities are available in Mexico. My answer is always the same. Mexico has enormous potential and many opportunities for business.

A better question is “what do you want to sell or invest in”? Without a doubt you will find that Mexico is a receptive market.

Here is my list of the top 4 industries and areas with great growth potential in Mexico.

The top 4 growth industries in Mexico

Construction – You name it and it will be built in Mexico in the coming years. Mega-infrastructure projects (electric plants, hydroelectric dams, highways, airports, marinas and ports, petroleum extraction), commercial, industrial and office construction and residential projects can be found in abundance throughout the country.

Tourism – Big push to develop tourism from the Federal, State and local governments. Tourism is a priority item on government agendas including: high-end hotels and resorts, sports and eco-tourism, business and professional events. Mexico has perfect weather, incredible rich history, open and accessible culture, thousands of miles of beaches, deserts and jungle, and easy access to the USA and Canada.

Medical and Pharmaceutical – Another government priority. Emphasis on preventative medicine and improving the quality of life provides rich areas of opportunity. The demographics in Mexico show that the market is growing and will continue to do so.

Security – This industry will remain strong and show exceptional growth in the future. There is strong demand by private industry, government, telecomunications and computer-related activities, the financial industry, international commerce, and the transportation industry to name but a few.





What to dial in order to reach a cellular phone in Mexico

29 08 2006

If you plan on living or doing business in Mexico, you will be calling cellular phone users.

I’ve listed examples of how to correctly dial in order to reach a cellular telephone in Mexico. There are 3 scenarios; local calls, domestic Mexican long distance and international long distance.

Let’s assume you want to call a cellular telephone in Leon, Guanajuato and the cellular phone number is 123-4567.

Example #1: Local call. If you are in Leon, Guanajuato and are calling a cellular phone number in Leon, you would dial from any phone:

044-477-123-4567

The 044 is the local access code for local cellular numbers.

The 477 is the area code of Leon, Guanajuato.

The 123-4567 is the telephone number.

 

Example #2: Domestic Mexican long distance. Calling a Leon cellular phone number from another city in Mexico. In this case you would dial

New dialing code Nov. 4, 2006  045-477-123-4567

Where 045 is the Mexico domestic long distance access number for cell phones.

477 is the area code for Leon.

123-4567 is the telephone number.

 

Example 3#: International long distance. If you are calling from the USA to a Mexican cellular phone in Leon, Guanajuato. You would dial;

New dialing rule Nov. 4, 2006  011-52-1-477-123-4567

011 is the international access code.

52 is the country code for Mexico.

1 is the cellular phone code.

477 is the area code of Leon.

123-4567 is the telephone number.

 

Remember that area codes for Mexico City (55), Guadalajara (33) and Monterrey (81) are 2 digits, followed by the telephone number that has 8 digits. All other cities have a 3 digit area code and 7 digit telephone number.

 

Related Links

Changes for dialing long distance to cellular phones in Mexico

Tip: How to call Mexico from the US

Mexican Area Code Search (TELMEX)

How to do business in Mexico





Meeting people in Mexico – kiss, shake hands or hug?

22 08 2006

What is the correct method to greet a business acquaintance in Mexico?

For a first time meeting with a business contact in Mexico a handshake is the appropriate greeting, eye contact is important, say your name, followed by the presentation of your business card. This applies to men and women.

When leaving the meeting or event it is appropriate and expected to shake everyone’s hand and say goodbye individually. This is also true for social situations.

If the business relationship has developed over time, you may find that upon arrival your host will hug you (un abrazo), giving 2 or 3 firm slaps on your back, followed by a handshake. This is a sign of confidence and friendship. This is also used when saying goodbye, especially when leaving on a trip, or when you will be separated for a long time.

Greeting women is a bit more complex. In developed relationships or personal relationships, an “air kiss” is common and expected. This is a swift encounter, cheek to cheek, and only on one side of the face. It may also be accompanied by a handshake. This greeting is common between women.

A man should always rise from his chair whenever a woman arrives at the table or is introduced.

My advice is to avoid the “air kiss” until you are approached, and it is obvious that the woman (or man) is comfortable with the kiss greeting. A handshake is the appropriate and “safe” greeting for all business and personal situations with women.

The kiss has no sexual connotations, it is a greeting of familiarity, but until you feel comfortable with it, and understand it’s use, best to be conservative and put your hand out.

Watch how others Mexicans greet one another. Learn to distinguish the differences in how business people, workers, friends, and family have different greetings.





Before you go on your business trip to Mexico

21 08 2006

When planning a trip to visit Mexico to investigate the market, make connections or to initiate business operations, contact the following groups and organization before you go. They can assist you with information, meetings, finding contacts and understanding the country, the people and the business environment.

Mexico Business Trip Planning, sources of information

1. Contact your country’s Consulate or Embassy closest to your intended destination and see if a meeting will be possible. It is important to determine if they have a commercial or trade officer, many times the embassies or consulates only handle political matters.

2. Trade or commercial missions sponsored by your industry, city, state, or other formal business related group. These missions provide structured access to trade organizations, top business people, and politicians. They are normally of low to moderate cost, and you will be travelling with others seeking similar information about the country.

3. Contact the Sustainable Economic Development office in the Mexican state and Economic Development office in the Mexican cities you wish to visit. They can provide information on costs of doing business, permits and permissions and can help you find the contacts or information you are seeking.

4. Your state or city may have an economic promotion office in Mexico seeking to promote the city or state businesses and relationships. They are more than happy to organize meetings with possible contacts in Mexico and provide business information for you.

5. Seek trade show or international industry events in Mexico. Coordinate your trip so that you can attend the event, and consult with government and private industry contacts before of after the fair.

Related Links 

How to do business in Mexico, Parts 1 – 28 

Tip:  How to call Mexico from the US 





Tip: How to call Mexico from the US

16 08 2006

Calling Mexico from the US can be confusing to the novice.

To dial Mexico from outside the country, you must dial “011” (access code) followed by the country code.

Mexico’s country code is “52” (country code).

Next is the area code. Mexico telephone numbers have a three digit area code followed by a seven digit number for most of the country.

The exception to the rule (and this is Mexico, there are always exceptions to the rule) can be found in 3 cities; Mexico City, Guadalajara and Monterrey. These cities have a two digit area code followed by an 8 digit number:

  • Mexico City “55” + 8 digits, area code is 55
  • Guadalajara “33” + 8 digits, area code is 33
  • Monterrey “81” + 8 digits, area code is 81
  • All other cities in Mexico “3 digits” + 7 digits, area code contains 3 digits

If you were to dial Mexico City: “011” + “52” + “55” + telephone number (8 digits)

If you were to dial Acapulco: “011” + “52” + “744” + telephone number (7 digits).

  • UPDATE October 17, 2006 – If you are dialing a Mexican cellphone from the USA after November 4, 2006, you must dial “011” – “52”- “1” -“Area Code” – “Telephone number”, this new rule covers 90% of the cellular phones in Mexico. Changes for Dialing Long Distance to Cellular Phones in Mexico

Selected area codes for some Mexican cities:

 

Acapulco “744” + 7 digits
Aguascalientes “449”+ 7 digits
Apizaco “241”
+ 7 digits
Cabo San Lucas “624”
+ 7 digits
C
ancun “998”+ 7 digits
Celaya “461”
+ 7 digits
Chihuahua “614”
+ 7 digits
Ciudad del Carmen “938”
+ 7 digits
Ciudad Juarez “656”+ 7 digits
Cuernavaca “777”
+ 7 digits
Culiacan “667”
+ 7 digits
Durango “618”
+ 7 digits
Ensenada “646”
+ 7 digits
Guadalajara “33” + 8 digits
Guanajuato “473” + 7 digits
Irapuato “462”+ 7 digits
Ixtapa “755 + 7 digits
Jalapa “932” + 7 digits
Juchita “971” + 7 digits
Leon “477” + 7 digits
Los Mochis “668” + 7 digits
Matamoros “871”
+ 7 digits
Mazatlan “869”
+ 7 digits
Merida “999”
+ 7 digits
Mexicali “686”
+ 7 digits
Mexico City “55” + 8 digits
Monterrey “81” + 8 digit
Morelia “443” + 7 digits
Nogales “631”
+ 7 digits
Nuevo Laredo “867”
+ 7 digits
Oaxaca de Juarez “951”
+ 7 digits
Playa del Carmen “984”
+ 7 digits
Progreso “861”
+ 7 digits
Puebla “222”
+ 7 digits
Puerto Vallarta “322” + 7 digits
Reynosa “899” + 7 digits
Saltillo “844” + 7 digits
San Francisco del Rincon “476”
+ 7 digits
San Miguel Allende “415” + 7 digits
Silao “472” + 7 digits
Tampico “833” + 7 digits
Tijuana “664” + 7 digits
Torreon “871” + 7 digits
Veracruz “229” + 7 digits
Villahermosa
“993” + 7 digits

intl. access + country code + area code + telephone number

“011” + “52” + “2 or 3 digit area code” + “7 or 8 digit telephone number”

For a complete list of all Mexican cities, check out the TELMEX area code search page (in spanish) Link

 

Related Links

What to dial in order to reach a cellular phone in Mexico

How to do business in Mexico

How to negotiate with Mexican business people

Mexican official (and unofficial) holidays

Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico

Meeting people in Mexico – kiss, shake hands or hug?

Before you go on your business trip to Mexico

Tipping Guidelines for Mexico

Official Government websites of the 32 Mexican states