Discount and Budget Airlines in Mexico

16 01 2007

Low cost and budget airlines are finding their way to Mexico.

These new airlines are offering international flights and national flights between intermediate cities in Mexico previously only accessible through bus lines or at much higher prices via the full service airlines.

The budget minded vacation or business traveller should check out the schedules and prices of these airlines next time you are travelling in and around Mexico.

Aero California

Aladia

Alma de Mexico

America West

ATA

A Volar

Aviacsa

Azteca

Click Mexicana

Frontier

InterJet

Jet Blue

MagniCharters

Mexus Airlines

Spirit

Ted

Viva Aerobus

Volaris

Related Links

Attitude Travel Latin America Low Cost Airlines

Discount Airlines in Mexico

How to call Mexico from the US

Airport Codes for Mexico





Doing Business in Mexico – cultural tips

1 11 2006

When doing business in Mexico you are very likely to see some, or all, of the following during a business trip. It’s part of the Mexican business and social culture.

  • Late arrival for meetings by participants. This might be up to 30 to 45 minutes late.
  • Cancellations at the last minute.
  • Changes in agreed upon plans and agendas.
  • Long lunches or dinners, where business talk is not the major theme.
  • Meetings that seem to go on for a long time before coming to the business issue.
  • People will gesture and use their hands a great deal while speaking.
  • There will be a degree of emotion in business discussions and presentations.
  • People will be very formal and polite.
  • People will sit very close to you when speaking, and often touch your arm or shoulder while talking.
  • Your Mexican partners will not be forth coming and explicit regarding bad news.
  • You will not hear the word NO a lot.
  • Deadlines may not be met for reasons that you don’t understand or don’t believe.
  • Until you establish a social relationship with your Mexican business partners, your business discussions will seem very vague, cold and unsatisfying.
  • Decision-making may be extremely swift or excruciatingly slow. You never will know why.
  • Dinners, parties, weddings and social gatherings last for hours. There is no such thing as a 2 hour cocktail party.
  • You will be encouraged to eat everything, drink plenty and enjoy yourself while in Mexico. Failure to do this is seen as a refusal of hospitality or a sign that you are not comfortable in Mexico or with your hosts.
  • In a social gathering the men will tend to congregate in one part of the room or table and the women in the other.

 

Related Links

 

Patience, Chaos and Doing Business in Mexico

How to do business in Mexico

Criticism – how to do business in Mexico

Meeting people in Mexico

How to negotiate with Mexican business people

How to call Mexico from the USA

Great International Business Trip Results

16 Essential questions – the international business traveller’s quiz





Great International Business Trip Results

16 10 2006

In any international relationship communication and understanding are critical for success.

Problems created by; language, stereotypes, misinformation, lack of information, and cultural misunderstandings combine with normal business problems to create a complicated scenario for anyone involved in international relationships and global business.

Prepare your international meetings and business presentations using the following questions as a guide to organize your ideas and focus on actions that will produce positive results for everyone involved.

6 Questions – Create Great International Business Trip Results

  1. What does this organization know about me, my company and my country?
  2. What do they think they know about me?
  3. What can I tell them that they do not know?
  4. What do I know about my international partner, culture and country?
  5. What do I think I know about this business, culture and country?
  6. What can they tell me that I do not know?

1. What does this organization know about me and my company. When you walk in the room an opinion has already been formed about you, your organization, and your ability to perform in the future. These ideas are based upon facts, information and past experience.

  • What has been the history of our relationship in their country?
  • Who has been involved in our mutual business, and why?
  • What promises have been made and kept by both?
  • What promises have been made and not delivered upon?
  • What have the major problems and success been in the past?
  • Press and media, our organizations promotional material.

2. What do they think they know about me. Clarifying the unknowns or presumed realities in a relationship is crucial to success. These ideas may be very damaging and limit your ability to trust one another. What stereotypical behaviour can you avoid or prevent? What can you clarify or refute through information or actions?

  • Behaviour and reacts based upon past experience with your organization.
  • Rumour and innuendo, press and media reports.
  • Negotiation styles.
  • Business objectives.
  • Behaviour, goals and methods of doing business based upon country and cultural stereotypes.

3. What can I tell them that they do not know. Today’s business world requires trust, information and solutions. Reinforcing your need to work with your international partner, providing important information or solutions, and clarifying misunderstandings can only help the relationship.

  • Clarify or destroy cultural stereotypes.
  • Clarify business objectives and why they are important in order to reach these objectives.
  • Provide solutions and alternatives to existing situations and challenges.
  • Provide information of value for their business and strategy.
  • Clearly identify current or potential business problems.
  • Predict and have answers ready for their questions.

4. What do I know about my International partner, culture and country? What do I know is true and not innuendo or interpretation? The numbers, facts, information, agreements and past performance history of the business. Information about the country and the business culture.

5. What do I think I know about this business, culture and country? What preconceived ideas and stereotypes are you working with? What are you assuming and what has been proven?

6. What can they tell me that I do not know? What questions do you need to ask in order to verify information or create plans. What pieces of your information puzzle are missing? This is the time to get your questions answered, what are they?

Related Links

Cultural misunderstanding it can happen to you

Stereotypes and global business

Create great international business relationships

16 Essential questions – the international business traveller’s quiz

Lessons in international business





Changes – dialing long distance to a cellular phone in Mexico

12 10 2006

New changes take effect for some cellular phone companies in Mexico on November 4, 2006.

The program is called “El Que Llama Paga Nacional”, which loosely translated means “Whoever Calls, Pays for the Call In Mexico”. Previously a long distance call to a cellular phone was shared between the caller and the receiver of the call.

New long distance dialing codes (after November 4, 2006) from “regular” landline phone to a cellular phone:

If calling from Mexico, long distance to a Mexican cell phone:
045-Area Code – Telephone number
(the old code was 01-Area Code-Telephone number)

If calling from other countries to a Mexican cell phone: 52-1-Area Code- Telephone number (old code was 52-Area Code- Telephone number)

This 045 prefix applies to calls to cellular phones using Telmex, Telefonos del Noroeste, Telcel, Iusacell, Iusatel, Telefonica, Baja Celular, Telefonia Celular del Norte, Portatel del Sureste, Telecomunicaciones del Golfo and Unefon service. This represents 90% of the cellular phone users in Mexico.

The person on the cellular phone receiving the call will not be charged, however the person making the call from the landline phone will be charged approximately $ 3.00 Mexican pesos per minute (an increase of 300% from the current rate). The rates are still being negotiated between the companies and final results should be available from Cofetel in the next week.

The following companies have not signed the agreement: Axtel, Avantel, Alestra and Maxcom. Dialing to cellular phones using these suppliers will remain the same (01-Area Code- Telephone number) and the costs are shared between the person dialing and the person receiving the call.

Related Links

Cofetel

El Que Llama Paga Nacional (pdf)

How to call Mexico from the USA





Airport codes for Mexico

21 09 2006

An alphabetical  listing, by city, of the 3 digit airport codes for Mexico.

  • AJS   Abreojos
  • ACA  Acapulco Alvarez International
  • AGU  Aguascalientes
  • XAL  Alamos
  • AZG  Apatzingan
  • BHL  Bahia de los Angeles
  • CPE  Campeche International
  • CNA  Cananea
  • CUN  Cancun
  • CTM  Chetumal
  • CUU  Chihuahua Villalobos
  • ACN  Ciudad Acuna International
  • CUA  Ciudad Constitucion
  • CME  Ciudad del Carmen
  • CJS  Ciudad Juarez International
  • MMC  Ciudad Mante
  • CEN  Ciudad Obregon
  • CVM Ciudad Victoria
  • CLQ  Colima
  • CZM  Cozumel Municipal
  • STZ  Cristobl Casas
  • CUL  Culiacan Bachiguala
  • DGO  Durango Victoria
  • ESE  Ensenada
  • GDL  Guadalajara Miguel Hidalgo
  • GYM  Guaymas Yanez
  • GUB  Guerrero Negro
  • HMO  Hermosillo P. Garcia
  • HUX  Huatulco B. Huatulco
  • ISJ  Isla Mujeres
  • ZIH  Ixtapa / Zihuatanejo International
  • IZT  Ixtepec
  • JAL  Jalapa
  • LAP  La Paz Leon
  • LZC  Lazaro Cardenas
  • BJX  Leon / Guanajuato del Bajio
  • LTO  Loreto
  • SJD  Los Cabos
  • LMM  Los Mochis Federal
  • ZLO  Manzanillo
  • MAM  Matamoros
  • MZT  Mazatlan Buelna
  • MID  Merida Rejon
  • MXL  Mexicali
  • AZP  Mexico City Atizapan
  • MEX  Mexico City Juarez International
  • TLC  Mexico City Morelos
  • NLU  Mexico City Santa Lucia
  • MTT  Minatitlan
  • LOV  Monclova
  • NTR  Monterrey Aeropuerto del Norte
  • MTY  Monterrey Escobedo
  • MLM  Morelia
  • MUG  Mulege
  • NOG  Nogales
  • NCG  Nueva Casas Grandes
  • NLD  Nuevo Laredo International
  • OAX  Oaxaca Xoxocotlan
  • PQM  Palenque
  • PDS  Piedras Negras
  • PNO  Pinotepa Nacional
  • PCM  Playa del Carmen
  • PUH Pochutla
  • PAZ  Poza Rica Tajin
  • PBC  Puebla Huejotsngo
  • PXM  Puerto Escondido
  • PJZ  Puerto Juarez
  • PPE  Puerto Penasco
  • PVR  Puerto Vallarta Ordaz
  • PCV  Punta Chivato
  • PCO  Punta Colorada
  • QRO  Queretaro
  • REX  Reynosa Blanco
  • SCX  Salina Cruz
  • SLW  Saltillo
  • SFH  San Felipe
  • SGM  San Ignacio
  • SLP  San Luis Potosi
  • UAC  San Luis Rio Colorado
  • SNQ  San Quintin
  • SRL  Santa Rosalia
  • TAM  Tampico Javier
  • TSL  Tamuin
  • TAP  Tapachula International
  • TCN  Tehuacan
  • TPQ  Tepic
  • TIJ  Tijuana
  • TZM  Tizimin
  • TRC  Torreon Sarabia
  • TUY  Tulum
  • TGZ  Tuxtla Gutierrrez Llano
  • UPN  Uruapan
  • VER  Veracruz
  • VIB  Villa Constitucion
  • VSA  Villahermosa C.R. Perez
  • ZCL  Zacatecas la Calera
  • ZMM  Zamora




Tipping guidelines for Mexico

13 09 2006

Tipping is always a concern for travellers. In Mexico, tipping is very common and expected, but there are no fixed rules for the amount of the tip. If someone is providing an extra service or favor for you, a tip would be expected and welcome.

You should always have loose change and low denomination bills with you in order to make the transaction effortless.

You should tip with the quantity that you feel comfortable with. I’ve provided some tip guidelines that should help get you started.

Basic guidelines for tipping in Mexico.

  • Restaurants – the normal tip amount is 10% -15% of the bill. There is a national value added tax (IVA) of 15% included on all restaurant bills, this is not the tip, this is a tax.  Many people leave a tip equal to the IVA, 15%, or leave 10% of the total bill that has the IVA tax included.
  • Bellhops and luggage handlers – $ 10 – $ 20 pesos per bag.
  • Hotel maids – $ 20 – $ 50 pesos per day.
  • Taxis – Depends upon the city, type of taxi (meter or negotiated price). If a metered cab, a tip would be expected perhaps 10% of the total. If the taxi is a negotiated price no tip would be expected. If a fixed rate to destination cab (for example airport cabs) a tip would be appreciated $ 10 – $ 20 pesos.
  • Gas station attendants – $5 – $ 10 pesos depending on the level of service
  • Bars – 10% of the total bill
  • Valet parking – $ 10 – $20
  • Grocery store baggers – $ 5

Related Links

How to do business in Mexico

Mexican official (and unofficial) holidays

Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico

Tip: How to call Mexico from the US





Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico

4 09 2006

Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico and Mexicans.

1. It is difficult to reach the top executives and business owners. The first contacts are difficult or impossible to make through “cold calling”. A much better strategy is to get personal introductions from consultants or other local business people.

2. Mexico is all about personal networks. They prefer to do business “face to face”. Impersonal methods of communication will be used, but plan on meeting your clients or suppliers as often as possible in order to maintain good relations and communications.

2. Use metric measurements, forget all other systems. Inches, pounds, feet, yards are not part of the Mexican culture. This is especially true for your promotional material and catalogues.

3. Don’t expect business people will return your phone calls. If the business item is important you should call several times.

4. Business negotiations will always be preceded with small talk and light conversation. This may continue for some time before business is finally discussed. Dinners and lunches are important for negotiations and often the items of real importance surface over coffee and dessert.

5. Proper etiquette and manners are very important. You will find the Mexicans are very cordial and polite, and they expect the same treatment from others. This is true for business and social occasions.

6. Secretaries and personal assistants are very important. They control who has access to executives and decision-makers. Many times they are responsible for answering the executive’s email and correspondence. Never underestimate the power of the secretary, and always maintain a friendly cordial relationship with them.

7. Meetings don’t start, or end on time. Don’t come late, but don’t get angry or upset when it doesn’t happen at the appointed hour.

8. The entire country shuts down from December 15 until about January 3 for vacations. Do not expect to find decision-makers in their offices, and expect slowdowns in logistics, paperwork and other communications during this time.

9. Everyone has a cellular phone. Get the cellular phone numbers of your contacts to avoid the filters in place at the office.

10. Mexicans tend to be reserved with foreign business people in the first business encounters. Business in Mexico is based upon trust between people. Take the time to create a relationship and build trust with your clients and suppliers. Don’t be in a hurry to close the deal. Don’t be in a rush to get the business over with. Don’t be afraid to visit several times without a specific work agenda. Get to know the people and culture.

11. Mexicans don’t like to disappoint others, and may prolong and delay bad news until the last possible moment. This can be prevented by establishing many short term objectives and chronologies. Constant open communication will also provide opportunities to discuss and find solutions for any set backs before it becomes a major problem.

12. Always try and deal with the boss or top executives. Business is done, approved and maintained by the top levels in the organization. Make sure the Mexican company understands that you are your company’s top executive with important decision-making powers.

Related Links

How to negotiate with Mexican business people

Meeting people in Mexico -kiss, shake hands or hug

Before you go on your business trip to Mexico

Tip: How to call Mexico from the US

How to do business in Mexico, parts 1 – 28





How to create an international business travel destination file

31 08 2006

The international business traveller has a lot of work to do before each trip. The preparation of the journey can be complicated and usually requires quite a bit of time in order to finalize visas, appointments, hotels, transportation, and tickets and connections.

I highly recommend an international travel destination file be created and maintained for the countries and business destinations that you or your organization travels to.

This should be updated each time someone visits the destination. This important accumulated business travel information will save time, money, trouble and aggravation for everyone required to travel in the future.

Notes should be written during the trip and a final executive summary presented and filed at most 5 days after your return. This is not a personal travel diary, and should be focused on providing practical useful information for the next person who is required to visit the destination on business.

The file should contain the following information and observations:

  • Is a visa required?  Contact information for the embassy or consulate, required information that must be submitted and the time required for the process from start to finish.
  • Travel agency and airlines used. Comments and observations about flights, connections, and prices.
  • Information about hotels that you have stayed in, names, addresses, telephone and fax numbers, email. Comments about the cost, distance to clients, pros and cons. security and other observations.
  • Alternative hotels to consider for the next trip and contact information.
  • Airports, names and airport 3 digit code. What services are available at the airport, money changing, auto rental, taxis, airport taxes upon arrival or departure, how far from the city or hotel, other comments.
  • Restaurants, recommendations, places to avoid, addresses and contact information.
  • Information and comments about business manners; the way people dress, gift giving, what NOT to do, other observations.
  • Cultural tips and observations. What and when do people eat. Tipping, what is correct. What to do or where to go in your off time.
  • Weather and climate. Recommendations for how to dress and what to pack.
  • Information about average costs, hotels, meals, transportation, and other related business costs
  • Other observations: What would you do differently and why? What would make the trip better or more efficient the next time? Recommendations for the next traveller from your organization.

The institutionalization of this information will result in more efficient planning and execution of travel plans, better administration of costs and time, and more satisfaction for the international road warriors in your organization. They can dedicate their time to getting work done, and not about travel worries.

Related Links

International business traveller -ambassador, explorer, map-maker

16 Essential Questions – International Business Traveller’s Quiz

7 Tips for doing business internationally

International Business Trip Planning, Part 6

International Business Trip Planning, Part 5

International Business Trip Planning, Part 4





Before you go on your business trip to Mexico

21 08 2006

When planning a trip to visit Mexico to investigate the market, make connections or to initiate business operations, contact the following groups and organization before you go. They can assist you with information, meetings, finding contacts and understanding the country, the people and the business environment.

Mexico Business Trip Planning, sources of information

1. Contact your country’s Consulate or Embassy closest to your intended destination and see if a meeting will be possible. It is important to determine if they have a commercial or trade officer, many times the embassies or consulates only handle political matters.

2. Trade or commercial missions sponsored by your industry, city, state, or other formal business related group. These missions provide structured access to trade organizations, top business people, and politicians. They are normally of low to moderate cost, and you will be travelling with others seeking similar information about the country.

3. Contact the Sustainable Economic Development office in the Mexican state and Economic Development office in the Mexican cities you wish to visit. They can provide information on costs of doing business, permits and permissions and can help you find the contacts or information you are seeking.

4. Your state or city may have an economic promotion office in Mexico seeking to promote the city or state businesses and relationships. They are more than happy to organize meetings with possible contacts in Mexico and provide business information for you.

5. Seek trade show or international industry events in Mexico. Coordinate your trip so that you can attend the event, and consult with government and private industry contacts before of after the fair.

Related Links 

How to do business in Mexico, Parts 1 – 28 

Tip:  How to call Mexico from the US