The 3 Y’s – help for difficult decisions

29 06 2007

An organization’s management and leadership team is responsible for making timely decisions, supplying and applying resources when required, in order to efficiently reach known or perceived goals and objectives.

In order to make these decisions; research, information and analysis of the pertinent information is required.

Here is where management bogs down or leadership can make serious misjudgements.

  • Poor incomplete analysis or lack of the critical information required to assess the risks, obtain the required resources or understand the probable benefits.
  • Lack of understanding of the changes or resources that the decision will provoke.
  • Making the decision too early, or too late.

A quick and useful trick is to apply the “3 Y’s” to assist when faced with a difficult decision.

The “3 Y’s”

  • Why Me?
  • Why Now?
  • Why Not?

The First Why – Why Me?

  • Who is requesting that I make the decision? Why?
  • Is this in my area of responsibility? Why?
  • Is this my area of expertise, do I know what I’m doing? Why?
  • Do I have enough key information to make the decision? Why?
  • Can I obtain more information, in how much time and at what cost? Why?
  • Do I understand the analysis of the data and the conclusions? Why?

The Second Why – Why Now?

  • Does this need to be done or decided now? Why?
  • Is it in response to an emergency, part of “normal” operations or a change in strategy and objectives? Why?
  • Who depends upon this decision or is affected by it? Why?
  • Should the involved parties be informed of how the decision will affect them? Why?

The Third Why – Why Not?

  • What happens if I don’t make the decision? Why?
  • Are there other options, solutions, or alternatives? Why?
  • Do I think this is the best solution or decision available? Why?
  • Do I fully understand the short term and long term effects on resources, customers, work systems, goals and objectives that this decision will provoke? Why?
  • Who are the internal or external “experts”, what is their recommendation? Why?
  • How far am I putting the organization at risk with this decision? Why?
  • Are there metrics to measure or contingency plans in place in case this does not go as planned? Why?

By reacting and making difficult decisions without reflecting on the WHY we miss identifying the real problems and issues.

We miss solutions and strategies.

We miss opportunities to unify and support the organization.

We find ourselves responding to symptoms and not solving or responding to the core issues.

Related Links

Can’t make a decision

9 steps to better decisions





Motivation – not the leader’s job?

28 05 2007

“It’s not my job to motivate my people, they should do this by themselves. It’s my job to make sure things get done right and on time.”

“I’m not here to hold hands and baby the employees, I’m here to make them perform and bring me results”

Ever heard that, or said that?

These comments are typically from leaders or managers who don’t believe motivated people are important in their business organization or results.

More than likely, they don’t have the “people skills” required to motivate others.

Sustaining motivation and enthusiasm at the workplace is one of the important factors in assuring business and personal success.

Leaders who tell me that motivating employees is not part of their job description, or not required for success are blind to the reality of working with other human beings.

Which group would you rather lead and work with, Group A, apathetic and unmotivated or Group B, focused and motivated?

A large part of motivation comes from the individual, it has to start here. There is no magic pill to give someone the desire and will to do their job with vigor and energy, striving for the best results possible.

You either have it, or you don’t. Hiring decisions should include an evaluation of an individual motivation potential.

Reinforcement and refocusing of personal motivation comes from the workplace, and workplace leaders.

Superior leaders know how to maintain momentum over time, keep the organization motivated, enthusiastic and focused.

Excellent results come from organizations that are motivated and are able to sustain their enthusiasm over time.

Failure to accept your role as leader and motivator at work is a a sure sign that you are not doing your job, and that your people and organization will not be performing at their best.

Motivating others is difficult and requires important social skills including listening, communicating, applied psychology and the art of negotiating.

All successful leaders share these skills or know how to find the right people in their organizations to keep their people motivated.

On your checklist of important goals and objectives for the organization this year add “maintain employees motivation” if you want to achieve all the other items on the list.

Related Links

Motivation – Heroic Moments

How to motivate yourself on Monday

Leadership, do you want the job – or just the title and benefits





Lonely and have no friends

7 08 2006

Once again we are reminded that America is becoming a lonely place to live.

More and more people are leading single lives. Moving frequently, working harder, and making fewer lasting and deep personal relationships. It is touching all ages, affecting the way we work, interact, live and even die.

It’s easier to not get involved with other people, are we losing friends and not making new one because we’re just lazy?
What’s behind this failure to make friend?

Is our work schedule so demanding that it leaves no time to develop relationships?

Are we too individualistic, and not willing to tolerate and accept others that might differ or interfere with our idea of how to live?

Shall we blame society, divorce, dysfunctional families and politics?

Perhaps it’s time to think about what friendships are and what can offer over the course of a lifetime.

What does it take to initiate, cultivate and maintain a friend and friendships?

Related

CNN: Lonely Nation

What happens when we have NO friends?

Do you have a destination in mind?