IMF predicts strong economic growth for Mexico

5 11 2006

Good news for Mexico and Mexican business.

The IMF (International Monetary Fund) released their Regional Economic Outlook: Western Hemisphere on November 2, 2006.

They are predicting a 4.4% growth rate for this year and strong indicators for medium term growth due to a strong financial sector in the country.

Get the entire report here: IMF – Regional Economic Outlook: Western Hemisphere (pdf file)

Related Links

Press Release: IMF sees continued robust growth in Latin America and in the Caribbean

IMF – Regional Economic Outlook: Western Hemisphere

IMF – Regional Economic Outlook: Western Hemisphere (pdf file)

BBC News: IMF praises Latin American growth

Bloomberg: Mexico’s growth to beat earlier forecast, IMF says





Mexico manufacturing, US inventories and safety stock

21 10 2006

Manufacturers are returning to Mexico after “experimenting” in the Asia Pacific region. Some of the big reasons for this return are ; to reduce time to market, eliminate the financial costs of inventories in transit, lower the logistics costs, and to strengthen the supply chain by moving closer to just-in-time deliveries.

But moving to Mexico isn’t going to solve all the problems.

A September 2006 article in CFO magazine points out how US businesses are increasing safety stocks “just in case”. Delayed in the USA The article points out how supply chain disruptions are being provoked by an increasingly saturated US highway system and bottlenecks in deepwater ports and railyards.

The good news is that Mexico is close to the USA, a truckload of goods can leave any point in Mexico and arrive at the US destination in as little as 4-5 days. The railyards and new multimodal Interior Port in Guanajuato, Mexico allow manufacturers to establish production facilities in the interior of the country. Exporters can now clear customs and load the sealed container onto the rail-car at the new (2006) high capacity Customs port located in the geographic center of Mexico.

The bad news is that unless the US begins to upgrade their highway, port and rail facilities, supply chain managers in the US will be buying and storing higher levels of inventory to assure continuity of operations, “just in case”.

Related Links

Delayed in the USA – Supply Chain

Industrial and Business Parks in Mexico

AMPIP Mexican Association of Industrial and Business Parks





Illegal immigration – USA and Mexico

18 10 2006

Immigration control is a global challenge, and yet not one developed country has developed a good workable and acceptable legal immigration plan that eliminates illegal immigration.

There are political solutions, and then there are real solutions.

Immigration between nations occurs when there are marked differences in economic wealth or living conditions between two regions. In order to eliminate massive immigration, wealth (and it’s distribution) of the economically disadvantaged country must improve or the wealthier country must lose it’s wealth.

The long-term solution to immigration will be found in changing economic conditions, policies and the creation of opportunities in the disadvantaged country.

A short-term solution will be found by building walls and increasing border enforcement (This is effective where the border areas are limited and can be totally controlled).

The current immigration situation between Mexico and the US has become a political football, and it appears political solutions are all that matter.

It’s time for both countries to work and invest in real, long-term economic solutions to solve fundamental problems in order to help and protect both countries. The US is facing a problem, and Mexico should assist their neighbor in finding solutions.

The Mexican perspective:

  • There are many opportunities and jobs available that pay much better than in Mexico.
  • There are no jobs available in Mexico for the majority of immigrants.
  • Going to the US is a “rite of passage” for many Mexicans in certain areas. Most return to Mexico after 3 – 5 years.
  • Many cross the border illegally to meet family members already in the US, and have jobs waiting for them once they arrive. Most immigrants have jobs in the US.
  • Most of the immigrants come from rural areas in Mexico, with low levels of education.
  • Mexican immigrants in the US send enormous sums of money to support family members in Mexico. Petroleum sales bring Mexico the most foreign currency income, followed by money sent by Mexicans in the USA (not all illegal immigrants) to family in Mexico.
  • For many Mexican state governments, this injection of foreign capital is very important for maintaining local economies.
  • Crossing the border illegally is dangerous and life threatening, and in many cases expensive.
  • US employers are open and supportive to employing illegal immigrants, and in many cases provide false identification and protection to the workers.
  • The majority of the millions of illegal immigrants currently in the US are working, and spending money in the local US economies.
  • The legal immigration mechanisms available (visas) reject those who are economically disadvantaged (the ones with the highest need to immigrate).
  • Mexicans believe that the US has the sovereign right to restrict and control immigration.
  • They would like to see a realistic legal migration program created.
  • The immigrants in the US pay sales taxes, and they consume goods and services in the US.

The US perspective

  • Illegal immigration takes jobs away from US citizens.
  • Illegal immigrants use social, health and welfare services paid for by US taxpayers.
  • Illegal immigrants bring crime, drugs and violence to communities.
  • Illegal immigrants don’t speak English and don’t learn English, and are forcing communities to spend money on bilingual teachers and government programs.
  • Illegal immigration can be stopped by building a wall or by enforcing the border.
  • Illegal immigrants don’t pay taxes.
  • US agricultural businesses cannot survive with competitive prices if illegal workers are eliminated. Legal immigration will increase labor costs.
  • Elimination of illegal immigrants will cause substantial increases in the costs of food, restaurants, hotels, construction and certain consumer and industrial goods and services. Immigrant labor is needed to maintain the US economy.
  • The US Border Control has stated many times that the solution is in enforcing and penalizing US employers that hire illegal workers, not by penalizing and deporting the illegal immigrant.
  • The US government and state governments understand the economic situation and provide political solutions for voters, but understand that the total elimination of immigration would severely hurt the US economy. A legal immigration solution must be implemented.
  • There is a fundamental dilema. America is the land made of immigrants, and yet now must begin to control this immigration. Huge uncontrolled borders, wealth and opportunity, and willingness of employers to hire undocumented workers combine to make the US an attractive immigration destination.

Opportunities and possible solutions

If we agree that the illegal immigration problem is a consequence of economic situations and differences in the distribution of wealth, then the following ideas are possible solutions. None of them are easy, all of them have costs, but they are the only real long-term solutions to the immigration situation.

  • US government and businesses coordinate with the Mexican government and business sector to invest in economic development projects in the areas in Mexico with the highest degree of poverty and immigration.
  • The Mexican government must aggressively work and invest in order to improve opportunities and wealth in their country, especially for the economically disadvantaged.
  • US businesses push for immigration reform that allows for temporary workers and legal immigration. The program would increase costs to the US employers, and the workers would be paying taxes.
  • US government makes laws and enforces them against US employers that hire illegal immigrants.
  • US government finds a method to legalize current immigrants that have been and are working in the US.

Related Links

Observations on illegal immigration in the US, possible solutions

How to do business in Mexico, Parts 1 – 28

Official government websites of the Mexican States

The definitive dialing guide for calling Mexico

Top States in Mexico for for doing business – World Bank Report 2007





Maquiladoras in Mexico

28 09 2006

An Internet search for the definition of the terms maquila and maquiladora will turn up quite a variety of ideas and interpretations.

The maquiladoras have created quite an emotional and political reaction on both sides of the US and Mexico border. They have been accused of stealing jobs from the US, promoting sub-standard working conditions, lowering wages, exploiting workers, and not contributing to the Mexican economy.

Despite the controversy, the maquiladoras are growing and thriving in Mexico. They offer attractive benefits to organizations that are seeking competitive production and assembly costs, skilled labor and Mexico’s proximity to the US market. Recently many transnational organizations that moved manufacturing operations to China in the 1990’s have moved back to Mexico due to cost and logistic advantages.

Maquila and Maquiladoras – definitions and activities

  • The term maquila comes from the Spanish term that refers to the portion paid (in grain, flour or oil) to a miller for milling a farmer’s grain.
  • Maquiladoras are legal entities under Mexican law, with special tax privileges, they provide service, assembly or manufacturing operations.
  • Maquiladoras are able to import raw materials or semi-processed materials from foreign countries, in order to service, process or assemble them in Mexico, and then export the finished product back to that country. These activities take place without the collection or payment of import, export or V.A.T. (value added tax) taxes.
  • The maquiladora program was created by Mexico in order for foreign organizations to take advantage of low labor costs in Mexico (primarily the USA), and to provide employment to Mexican workers in Mexico. Initially the maquila operations were located close to the US border. Currently maquila operations can be found throughout Mexico.
  • Maquiladoras can be 100% foreign owned, 100% Mexican owned, or a joint venture between Mexican nationals and foreign investors.
  • Maquiladoras are also known as twin plants, in-bond industries, export assembly plants and offshoring.
  • The maquiladoras in Mexico suffered from a crisis of plant closings in the 1990’s and early 2000’s as many companies moved operations to China. Since 2004, Mexico has seen a resurgence of the maquiladoras.

  • Check with your attorneys and accountants in Mexico about the specific benefits of the maquila program. As of September 2006, there were important legal changes (simplification and consolidation of government compliance and monitoring programs) that will affect current and future maquiladoras.

Related Links

Why you should pay attention to free trade treaties

Industrial and business parks in Mexico


Official government websites of the 32 Mexican states

Maquila and Maquiladoras in Mexico





World Bank report – Doing Business in Mexico

23 09 2006

The World Bank has an on-line report available entitled “Doing Business in Mexico“. The study was published in December of 2005.

“Cosponsored by COFEMER, USAID, and the World Bank Group, Doing Business in Mexico is the first state-level report of the Doing Business series in Latin America. This report investigates the scope and manner of regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it.

The report covers the following thirteen Mexican cities and four areas of regulation: Starting a business, Registering property, obtaining credit and enforcing a contract.”

“When compared, Mexico City and the 12 other cities differ dramatically on the four indicators the report measures. “

The cities and regulations analyzed include: Aguascalientes, Celaya, Ciudad Juarez, Guadalajara, Monterrey, Veracruz, Merida, San Luis Potosi, Torreon, Mexico City, Tlalnepantla, Puebla, and Queretaro.

Of special note is the following comment. “The report concludes that reform is sorely needed. Much of the opportunity for improvement is in local administrative procedures, which can be changed by a governor or a mayor.”

This is very important. A governor or local mayor can make an important difference on the ease of setting up and doing business in Mexico. Seek out those states and cities with pro-active leadership. Find those areas that are investing heavily in infrastructure or have a dynamic policy focused on foreign investment and economic development.

Related Links

Doing Business in Mexico – World Bank

Doing Business in Mexico (PDF)

Press Release (PDF)





Industrial and Business Parks in Mexico

20 09 2006

Looking for a “plug and play” solution for your business or factory in Mexico? Take a hard look at the advantages that Mexican industrial parks offer.

AMPIP (Mexican Association of Business and Industrial Parks) can partner with you and provide contacts and information about Mexico’s industrial and business parks. They work closely with private industry, state and local governments and real estate organizations in order to provide solutions for companies seeking to quickly and easily establish a physical presence in Mexico.

“Investment Promotion
AMPIP has become one of Mexico’s leading agencies for the promotion of foreign investment projects, thanks to its participation in national and international shows, the advertising in specialized media, the alliance with other business associations and the permanent contact with a wide network of corporations and real estate players, as well as with government officials.

Part of the promotion activities include the registration of industrial assets owned by AMPIP members in our Industrial Real Estate Promotion System, available on-line at our Internet site, apart from the printed material, such as location maps edited in conjunction with the Mexican Bank for Foreign Trade (Bancomext), which are distributed worldwide.”

There are specific and unique advantages of industrial and business parks. Saving time and money are among the biggest factors. Access to transportation, power and communication infrastructure is another. The definition of “Industrial Park” will provide some idea of the other advantages.

“What is an Industrial Park?

An industrial park is a delimited extension of land, characterized by four main aspects:

1. It is located close to transport facilities, such as hightways, airports, sea ports and railways.

2. It concentrates essential dedicated infrastructure in one location for industrial operations, such as water (including sewer lines, drainage systems), electricity (including high power supply lines), telecommunications and roads.

3. It fulfills all the prerequisites to obtain the permission from local authorities for the set up of new operations (construction, environment, etc.)

4. It has a central administration that coordinates the internal safety of assets, the maintenance of public infrastructure, the promotion of new operations and the affairs with local authorities”

For more detailed information, contact: Associacion Mexicana de Parques Industriales, Monte Camerùn 54 – 1, Colonia Lomas de Barrilaco, C.P. 11010, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, Mèxico D.F., Mexico Tel. +52 (55) 2623-2216 Fax +52 (55) 2623-2218 Email ampip@ampip.org.mx

Related Links

AMPIP Mexican Association of Business and Industrial Parks

Official Government websites of the 32 Mexican states

How to do business in Mexico

How to negotiate with Mexican business people

Mexican official (and unofficial) holidays

Tip: How to call Mexico from the US

What to dial in order to reach a cellular phone in Mexico

Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico

Meeting people in Mexico – kiss, shake hands or hug?

Before you go on your business trip to Mexico

Tipping Guidelines for Mexico





Mexico and international free trade treaties

19 09 2006

Mexico has signed 11 international free trade treaties and 2 complimentary economic agreements since 1993.

Mexico is the only country in the world with active free-trade treaties that cover North American and the entire European Community.

These free trade agreements have made Mexico highly competitive in terms of manufacturing for export to world markets, for the importation of raw materials for manufacturing and for the import of consumer goods for sale in Mexico.

The free trade agreements currently in place include:

  • TLCAN – Includes Mexico, USA and Canada – Initiated January 1, 1994 (NAFTA in English)
  • TLC-G3 – Includes Mexico, Colombia and Venezuela – Initiated January 1, 1995
  • TLC Mexico-Costa Rica – Includes Mexico and Costa Rica – Initiated January 1, 1995
  • TLC Mexico – Bolivia – Includes Mexico and Bolivia – Initiated January 1, 1995
  • TLC Mexico – Nicaragua – Includes Mexico and Nicaragua – Initiated July 1, 1998
  • TLC Mexico – Chile – Includes Mexico and Chile – Initiated August 1, 1999
  • TLCUEM – Includes Mexico and the European Union (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Holland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom, Cypress, Czech Republic, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia) – Initiated July 1, 2000.
  • TLC Mexico – Israel – Includes Mexico and Israel – Initiated July 1, 2000
  • TLC Mexico – TN – Includes Mexico, El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras – Initiated on March 15, 2001 with El Salvador and Guatemala and June 1, 2001 with Honduras
  • TLC Mexico – AELC – Includes Mexico, Iceland, Norway, Liechtenstein and Switzerland – Initiated July 1, 2001
  • TLC Mexico – Uruguay – Includes Mexico and Uruguay – Initiated in July 15, 2004
  • AAE Mexico – Japan – Includes Mexico and Japan – Initiated April 1, 2005

In addition there are Complementary Economic Agreements (ACE’s) in place with Brazil and Argentina.

Related Links 

Why you should pay attention to free trade treaties