Business in Mexico, conversation themes

15 09 2006

When going to Mexico for business, be prepared for conversations. Mexicans are social people. They love to gather in groups and socialize. You can be assured of plenty of conversations during your visit.

Most business meetings and business dinners will involve a great deal of conversation of off-topic ideas before getting to business. Your ability to participate and keep the conversation moving is an important part of creating trust and the bonds required for doing business successfully in Mexico.

What topics are of general interest in Mexico?

Be cautious about introducing your personal opinions about politics and religion. Asking others to explain the current situation, so that you can understand it, is a safe way to venture into themes related to politics and economics.

Currently (September 2006) the following themes are sure to provoke conversations, discussions and opinions when in Mexico.

  • The recent Mexican presidential elections. Predictions for the future, scenarios, how it will might affect business and Mexico.
  • Your industry or business sector. Any international or national news, information, gossip, trends or tendencies related to your business sector.
  • Infrastructure projects in the city or state where you are visiting
  • China and it’s impact on the Mexican economy
  • Children and family
  • News or current events that can be found on the front page of the local or national newspaper
  • Recommendations on when and where to vacation in Mexico

Related Links

Create great international relationships

Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico





Cultural misunderstanding, it can happen to you.

15 09 2006

When we think of industry leaders in marketing and branding, Disney comes to mind. Geniuses in promoting their brand. Magnificent marketers. Leaders in the theme park industry. Universally recognized brand.

What could possibly go wrong with their expansion into Hong Kong and the Asian-Pacific market? Cultural misunderstanding.

Expansion into international markets and working with other cultures has created unforeseen headaches and problems for Disney once again. Disneyland struggles in Hong Kong

This is not the first time Disney has encountered cultural problems in international projects. EuroDisney also suffered from problems related to culture and customs that were not predicted or not taken seriously.

Disney is not alone. Virtually all organizations seeking to export and participate in international markets face steep learning curves about culture, customs and manners. Mistakes are made, at times very costly mistakes.

The lesson to be learned is to spend the time and money to understand your international markets and the culture where you will be doing business. It’s not enough to understand your brand and current customers. Never underestimate any cultural factor, and never assume that your model, project or way of life will be embraced fully and without reservations.

Related Links

Create great international business relationships

Stereotypes and global business





Create great international business relationships

14 09 2006

Working with individuals and ideas from cultures different from our own is complex, and filled with opportunities to misunderstand and offend everyone involved. It requires time to develop trust and understanding for all the players involved.

Take the time to learn how and why business is done in the country. Don’t judge the results based upon your culture and your country’s standards.

There is nothing more damaging to an international relationship than criticism based upon a lack of understanding. You must learn before you attempt to teach new ideas, strategies and procedures.

When doing business in Mexico remember that no matter what you feel or believe about your company’s products or procedures, Mexicans know their market and people better than you do. They know the correct business etiquette and the “invisible” cultural nuances that are required in order to do business in Mexico.

If you enter into business in Mexico with the idea that you are going to “teach the Mexicans how business is really done” I am confident you will suffer some serious problems.

Pushing procedures and business strategies into Mexico will surely cause divisions, it can turn into an “us versus them” situation for employees and customers.

I recommend that your focus be on learning and understanding how business in currently done in Mexico, and why. Once you have this knowledge, teach and explore your cultures and organizations solutions and strategies with your Mexican collaborators. I’ll bet the ideas will get modified if necessary, implemented and embraced quickly.

The creation of hybrid strategies, using elements from both cultures, will guarantee unification and understanding for everyone involved.

Before you start a revolution it’s essential to fully understand the status quo.

 

Related Links

International Business Tips

Stereotypes and global business

International business traveller – ambassador, explorer, map-maker





Official government websites of the 32 Mexican States

13 09 2006

Links to the Official Government Websites of the Mexican States

  • Oaxaca – Not currently available
  • Tlaxcala – Not currently available

Many of these sites have the information available in the english language. Search the entry page for links to versions in english (or ingles).

Related Links

How to do business in Mexico

How to negotiate with Mexican business people

Mexican official (and unofficial) holidays

Tip: How to call Mexico from the US

What to dial in order to reach a cellular phone in Mexico

Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico

Meeting people in Mexico – kiss, shake hands or hug?

Before you go on your business trip to Mexico

Tipping Guidelines for Mexico





Tipping guidelines for Mexico

13 09 2006

Tipping is always a concern for travellers. In Mexico, tipping is very common and expected, but there are no fixed rules for the amount of the tip. If someone is providing an extra service or favor for you, a tip would be expected and welcome.

You should always have loose change and low denomination bills with you in order to make the transaction effortless.

You should tip with the quantity that you feel comfortable with. I’ve provided some tip guidelines that should help get you started.

Basic guidelines for tipping in Mexico.

  • Restaurants – the normal tip amount is 10% -15% of the bill. There is a national value added tax (IVA) of 15% included on all restaurant bills, this is not the tip, this is a tax.  Many people leave a tip equal to the IVA, 15%, or leave 10% of the total bill that has the IVA tax included.
  • Bellhops and luggage handlers – $ 10 – $ 20 pesos per bag.
  • Hotel maids – $ 20 – $ 50 pesos per day.
  • Taxis – Depends upon the city, type of taxi (meter or negotiated price). If a metered cab, a tip would be expected perhaps 10% of the total. If the taxi is a negotiated price no tip would be expected. If a fixed rate to destination cab (for example airport cabs) a tip would be appreciated $ 10 – $ 20 pesos.
  • Gas station attendants – $5 – $ 10 pesos depending on the level of service
  • Bars – 10% of the total bill
  • Valet parking – $ 10 – $20
  • Grocery store baggers – $ 5

Related Links

How to do business in Mexico

Mexican official (and unofficial) holidays

Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico

Tip: How to call Mexico from the US





Mexican official (and unofficial) holidays

11 09 2006

Travelling to Mexico for business or pleasure?  Check the official Mexican holiday calendar to find best dates and avoid the crowds or ensure your business contacts will be there to meet you.
Mexico currently recognizes the following dates as official national holiday dates.  This means that the majority of businesses in Mexico will close, including all banks and all government agencies.

In 2006 Mexico authorized alternative dates (Mondays) for the observance of certain national holidays.  These dates are published yearly in the “Diario Oficial”.

  • January 1 – New Year’s Day
  • February 5 – Celebration of the Mexican Constitution (1917)
  • March 21 – Anniversary of the birth of Benito Juarez (1806)
  • May 1 – Labor Day
  • September 16 – Mexican Independence Day (1810)
  • November 20 – Anniversary of the Mexican Revolution (1910)
  • December 1 – Every 6 years when the power is transferred from the current president to the president elect
  • December 25 – Christmas Day

In addition there are some dates that are not official holidays, but due to local culture and customs you will find that many businesses are closed or many decision-makers are on vacation.  These include:

  • The week before Easter, especially the Thursday and Friday prior to Easter.  Holy Week (Semana Santa) is widely celebrated as a religious holiday and annual vacation time for families.  Beaches and resorts are favorite destinations.
  • May 10 – Mexican mothers day.  Always celebrated on this date, regardless of what day of the week it falls on.
  • Mid July until late August – Summer vacation time for families.  Beaches and resorts are favorite destinations.
  • Dec 12 – Day of the Celebration of the Virgin of Guadalupe.
  • December 16 until January 2 – The time of the “Posadas”, pre and post Christmas celebrations.  Many companies use these dates for annual vacations.
  • There also may be local celebrations by specific towns and cities, in order to celebrate the founding of the city or special religious events.  Businesses will normally close on these days.

Related Links

Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico

Tip:  How to call Mexico from the US

Meeting people in Mexico – kiss, shake hands or hug? 

Before you go on your business trip to Mexico

How to do business in Mexico, Parts 1 – 28 





Stereotypes and global business

8 09 2006

A stereotype is defined as an unvarying form or pattern, specifically a fixed or conventional notion or conception of a person, group, idea, etc., held by a number of people and allows for no individuality or critical judgement. (Webster’s New World Dictionary, 1998)

Stereotypes are representative of a society’s collective knowledge of customs, myths, religion, ideas and sciences (McCrea,Stangor and Hewstone)

Working with global clients and international cultures provides the opportunity to breakdown and destroy existing stereotypes. Global business encourages and forces a confrontation of cultures and preconceived ideas.

Successful international trade and business is all about marketing. Marketing your product, yourself, the organization, your country and customs. Changing fixed and conventional notions and beliefs.

Interactions with other countries and cultures will be successful when we create an atmosphere of trust, build enthusiasm and excitement, and project an image of the organization or product that appeals to, and will be embraced by the client.

In essence, we are breaking the old stereotypes and helping to create new ones.

Related Link

International business traveller – ambassador, explorer, map-maker

7 tips for doing business internationally





Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico

4 09 2006

Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico and Mexicans.

1. It is difficult to reach the top executives and business owners. The first contacts are difficult or impossible to make through “cold calling”. A much better strategy is to get personal introductions from consultants or other local business people.

2. Mexico is all about personal networks. They prefer to do business “face to face”. Impersonal methods of communication will be used, but plan on meeting your clients or suppliers as often as possible in order to maintain good relations and communications.

2. Use metric measurements, forget all other systems. Inches, pounds, feet, yards are not part of the Mexican culture. This is especially true for your promotional material and catalogues.

3. Don’t expect business people will return your phone calls. If the business item is important you should call several times.

4. Business negotiations will always be preceded with small talk and light conversation. This may continue for some time before business is finally discussed. Dinners and lunches are important for negotiations and often the items of real importance surface over coffee and dessert.

5. Proper etiquette and manners are very important. You will find the Mexicans are very cordial and polite, and they expect the same treatment from others. This is true for business and social occasions.

6. Secretaries and personal assistants are very important. They control who has access to executives and decision-makers. Many times they are responsible for answering the executive’s email and correspondence. Never underestimate the power of the secretary, and always maintain a friendly cordial relationship with them.

7. Meetings don’t start, or end on time. Don’t come late, but don’t get angry or upset when it doesn’t happen at the appointed hour.

8. The entire country shuts down from December 15 until about January 3 for vacations. Do not expect to find decision-makers in their offices, and expect slowdowns in logistics, paperwork and other communications during this time.

9. Everyone has a cellular phone. Get the cellular phone numbers of your contacts to avoid the filters in place at the office.

10. Mexicans tend to be reserved with foreign business people in the first business encounters. Business in Mexico is based upon trust between people. Take the time to create a relationship and build trust with your clients and suppliers. Don’t be in a hurry to close the deal. Don’t be in a rush to get the business over with. Don’t be afraid to visit several times without a specific work agenda. Get to know the people and culture.

11. Mexicans don’t like to disappoint others, and may prolong and delay bad news until the last possible moment. This can be prevented by establishing many short term objectives and chronologies. Constant open communication will also provide opportunities to discuss and find solutions for any set backs before it becomes a major problem.

12. Always try and deal with the boss or top executives. Business is done, approved and maintained by the top levels in the organization. Make sure the Mexican company understands that you are your company’s top executive with important decision-making powers.

Related Links

How to negotiate with Mexican business people

Meeting people in Mexico -kiss, shake hands or hug

Before you go on your business trip to Mexico

Tip: How to call Mexico from the US

How to do business in Mexico, parts 1 – 28





The right breakfast can boost your brainpower

1 09 2006

Got an all day meeting with the boss, attending a seminar or conference, have important negotiations with clients or suppliers, cranking out a mountain of work today? If you haven’t had the right food for breakfast, you results may be up to 20% below your capabilities.

A study by Duke University on children revealed evidence that what you eat in the morning has a definite effect on your ability to learn and concentrate. Link

This is especially relevant for the business traveller. Too often breakfast is a cup of coffee and a donut. Add up the factors of jet lag, a poor night’s sleep, change in personal routine, late night wining and dining clients, stress, and a lousy breakfast and you can quickly see how your professional results might not be at 100%.

Eat that brain boosting breakfast, protein and whole grains; including oatmeal, whole grain bread, toast or cereal, dried fruits or an egg white omelet. Turn your back on sugary and refined starches. Do yourself a favor, eat the right breakfast and let your brain work at 100% for the rest of the day.

Related Links

A better breakfast can boost a child’s brainpower

11 steps to a better brain





How to create an international business travel destination file

31 08 2006

The international business traveller has a lot of work to do before each trip. The preparation of the journey can be complicated and usually requires quite a bit of time in order to finalize visas, appointments, hotels, transportation, and tickets and connections.

I highly recommend an international travel destination file be created and maintained for the countries and business destinations that you or your organization travels to.

This should be updated each time someone visits the destination. This important accumulated business travel information will save time, money, trouble and aggravation for everyone required to travel in the future.

Notes should be written during the trip and a final executive summary presented and filed at most 5 days after your return. This is not a personal travel diary, and should be focused on providing practical useful information for the next person who is required to visit the destination on business.

The file should contain the following information and observations:

  • Is a visa required?  Contact information for the embassy or consulate, required information that must be submitted and the time required for the process from start to finish.
  • Travel agency and airlines used. Comments and observations about flights, connections, and prices.
  • Information about hotels that you have stayed in, names, addresses, telephone and fax numbers, email. Comments about the cost, distance to clients, pros and cons. security and other observations.
  • Alternative hotels to consider for the next trip and contact information.
  • Airports, names and airport 3 digit code. What services are available at the airport, money changing, auto rental, taxis, airport taxes upon arrival or departure, how far from the city or hotel, other comments.
  • Restaurants, recommendations, places to avoid, addresses and contact information.
  • Information and comments about business manners; the way people dress, gift giving, what NOT to do, other observations.
  • Cultural tips and observations. What and when do people eat. Tipping, what is correct. What to do or where to go in your off time.
  • Weather and climate. Recommendations for how to dress and what to pack.
  • Information about average costs, hotels, meals, transportation, and other related business costs
  • Other observations: What would you do differently and why? What would make the trip better or more efficient the next time? Recommendations for the next traveller from your organization.

The institutionalization of this information will result in more efficient planning and execution of travel plans, better administration of costs and time, and more satisfaction for the international road warriors in your organization. They can dedicate their time to getting work done, and not about travel worries.

Related Links

International business traveller -ambassador, explorer, map-maker

16 Essential Questions – International Business Traveller’s Quiz

7 Tips for doing business internationally

International Business Trip Planning, Part 6

International Business Trip Planning, Part 5

International Business Trip Planning, Part 4





What to dial in order to reach a cellular phone in Mexico

29 08 2006

If you plan on living or doing business in Mexico, you will be calling cellular phone users.

I’ve listed examples of how to correctly dial in order to reach a cellular telephone in Mexico. There are 3 scenarios; local calls, domestic Mexican long distance and international long distance.

Let’s assume you want to call a cellular telephone in Leon, Guanajuato and the cellular phone number is 123-4567.

Example #1: Local call. If you are in Leon, Guanajuato and are calling a cellular phone number in Leon, you would dial from any phone:

044-477-123-4567

The 044 is the local access code for local cellular numbers.

The 477 is the area code of Leon, Guanajuato.

The 123-4567 is the telephone number.

 

Example #2: Domestic Mexican long distance. Calling a Leon cellular phone number from another city in Mexico. In this case you would dial

New dialing code Nov. 4, 2006  045-477-123-4567

Where 045 is the Mexico domestic long distance access number for cell phones.

477 is the area code for Leon.

123-4567 is the telephone number.

 

Example 3#: International long distance. If you are calling from the USA to a Mexican cellular phone in Leon, Guanajuato. You would dial;

New dialing rule Nov. 4, 2006  011-52-1-477-123-4567

011 is the international access code.

52 is the country code for Mexico.

1 is the cellular phone code.

477 is the area code of Leon.

123-4567 is the telephone number.

 

Remember that area codes for Mexico City (55), Guadalajara (33) and Monterrey (81) are 2 digits, followed by the telephone number that has 8 digits. All other cities have a 3 digit area code and 7 digit telephone number.

 

Related Links

Changes for dialing long distance to cellular phones in Mexico

Tip: How to call Mexico from the US

Mexican Area Code Search (TELMEX)

How to do business in Mexico





How to negotiate with Mexican business people

25 08 2006

Mexico has a culture that embraces and enjoys negotiations. From the schoolyard to the local markets to the executive boardrooms, negotiations are an important part of everyday life for Mexican citizens.

Mexican business people are good negotiators and enjoy the process.

You can expect tough negotiations if you are doing business in Mexico. Tough negotiations in the sense that they will question everything, and spend a great deal of time trying to get you to accept their point of view or conditions. The arguments may be based on emotions or facts, or both.

You should always come into the negotiation very well prepared. Know what you want, and have the evidence to support your claim. Your arguments, supported by facts, will be heard and processed by your Mexican counterparts. If facts are presented that are new, take the time to verify the information and sources before you reach a conclusion.

Negotiations in Mexico can be compared to the first round of a sporting event, both sides desire to “win”, but rarely do they burst onto the field with all their energy in the first 5 minutes. The process of “feeling out” the opponent, observing their strengths and weaknesses, are critical to understanding how to develop a winning strategy and understanding what you are up against.

Mexicans are often seeking a long term, stable relationship with suppliers and clients. Focus your negotiations and decisions on creating a long term business relationship and strategy with your Mexican counterpart.

Your ability to negotiate will be a reflection of your company, your character, and your abilities as a business person. Take your time, don’t get emotional, support your arguments with facts, and be consistent with your demands or desires over time. The negotiation process is helping to build trust and credibility, it’s important to build solid foundations for your future relationship.

Don’t be in a hurry to end the negotiations. The Mexican culture is more permissive about time and deadlines than you find in USA or Europe. If you are in a rush, you will lose important negotiating power.

Always start your negotiation with some margin and leeway. It will always to be to your advantage to “give” a little before the negotiations are over. It may take 4 hours for you to “give in”, but the gesture will be seen as your willingness to do business and enough for the negotiator to claim a little victory. Everyone wins.

Write down your final agreement, and the results of your negotiations and have both sides sign and retain a copy. This simple step will avoid any language, communication or interpretation problems that may develop in the future.

Related Links

Meeting People in Mexico – kiss, shake hands or hug

Before you go on a business trip to Mexico

How to do business in Mexico, parts 1 – 28

16 Essential Questions – International Business Traveller’s Quiz





Meeting people in Mexico – kiss, shake hands or hug?

22 08 2006

What is the correct method to greet a business acquaintance in Mexico?

For a first time meeting with a business contact in Mexico a handshake is the appropriate greeting, eye contact is important, say your name, followed by the presentation of your business card. This applies to men and women.

When leaving the meeting or event it is appropriate and expected to shake everyone’s hand and say goodbye individually. This is also true for social situations.

If the business relationship has developed over time, you may find that upon arrival your host will hug you (un abrazo), giving 2 or 3 firm slaps on your back, followed by a handshake. This is a sign of confidence and friendship. This is also used when saying goodbye, especially when leaving on a trip, or when you will be separated for a long time.

Greeting women is a bit more complex. In developed relationships or personal relationships, an “air kiss” is common and expected. This is a swift encounter, cheek to cheek, and only on one side of the face. It may also be accompanied by a handshake. This greeting is common between women.

A man should always rise from his chair whenever a woman arrives at the table or is introduced.

My advice is to avoid the “air kiss” until you are approached, and it is obvious that the woman (or man) is comfortable with the kiss greeting. A handshake is the appropriate and “safe” greeting for all business and personal situations with women.

The kiss has no sexual connotations, it is a greeting of familiarity, but until you feel comfortable with it, and understand it’s use, best to be conservative and put your hand out.

Watch how others Mexicans greet one another. Learn to distinguish the differences in how business people, workers, friends, and family have different greetings.





Before you go on your business trip to Mexico

21 08 2006

When planning a trip to visit Mexico to investigate the market, make connections or to initiate business operations, contact the following groups and organization before you go. They can assist you with information, meetings, finding contacts and understanding the country, the people and the business environment.

Mexico Business Trip Planning, sources of information

1. Contact your country’s Consulate or Embassy closest to your intended destination and see if a meeting will be possible. It is important to determine if they have a commercial or trade officer, many times the embassies or consulates only handle political matters.

2. Trade or commercial missions sponsored by your industry, city, state, or other formal business related group. These missions provide structured access to trade organizations, top business people, and politicians. They are normally of low to moderate cost, and you will be travelling with others seeking similar information about the country.

3. Contact the Sustainable Economic Development office in the Mexican state and Economic Development office in the Mexican cities you wish to visit. They can provide information on costs of doing business, permits and permissions and can help you find the contacts or information you are seeking.

4. Your state or city may have an economic promotion office in Mexico seeking to promote the city or state businesses and relationships. They are more than happy to organize meetings with possible contacts in Mexico and provide business information for you.

5. Seek trade show or international industry events in Mexico. Coordinate your trip so that you can attend the event, and consult with government and private industry contacts before of after the fair.

Related Links 

How to do business in Mexico, Parts 1 – 28 

Tip:  How to call Mexico from the US 





International business traveller – ambassador, explorer, map-maker

21 08 2006

The critical roles played by international business travellers.

International business travellers play an incredibly important role as ambassadors, explorers and “map-makers” inside their organizations and with their overseas contacts.

Ambassadors, Explorers, and “Map-Makers”

Ambassador of your country and culture. During your trip your actions and reactions are being watched by others. They are trying to confirm, deny or create stereotypes of your country. Everything including your inter-personal skills, business negotiation skills and manners, the way you dress and eat, your choice of hotels, table manners, social skills, and the ability to make small-talk and conversation will be watched, examined and commented upon after you leave. Keep this idea clear at all time during your trip, it is important.

Ambassador of your company. Prepare and bring all materials required for the negotiations and business interactions. Project an aura of professionalism, a willingness to learn and share, and honesty. Create relationships with a long-term vision. You may be promoted or leave the organization some day, but your international contacts will continue to do business with your company.

Ambassador of you. International business is all about relationships, and your behaviour and attitudes are critically important as the liaison and trusted representative. Make promises you can keep, follow-through on the projects and projects. Project honesty and a concern for doing business and maintaining relationships. Your actions should focus on creating a climate of trust and open communication. Don’t try to be someone you are not.

Explorer. The international business traveller, technicians, and sales and business development executives have the added responsibility of verifying existing information, establishing new contacts that will be beneficial in the future, and discovering new ideas and opportunities. It requires an inquisitive character, a bit of courage and a spirit of adventure.

Map-Maker. Often neglected by organizations is the cultural, political and personal information gathered by international business people. This information (or data), should be gathered, filtered and consolidated, and available to the organization after every overseas trip. “Maps” should be made for future consultation and reference. The map-making role requires the separation of the facts from interpretation, personal anecdotes and opinions. This information becomes the foundation for all future strategic and operating decisions.

Related Links

7 Tips for International Business

16 Essential Questions – International Business Traveller’s Quiz

How to do Business in Mexico, Parts 1 – 28

International Business Trip Planning, Part 6





Tip: How to call Mexico from the US

16 08 2006

Calling Mexico from the US can be confusing to the novice.

To dial Mexico from outside the country, you must dial “011” (access code) followed by the country code.

Mexico’s country code is “52” (country code).

Next is the area code. Mexico telephone numbers have a three digit area code followed by a seven digit number for most of the country.

The exception to the rule (and this is Mexico, there are always exceptions to the rule) can be found in 3 cities; Mexico City, Guadalajara and Monterrey. These cities have a two digit area code followed by an 8 digit number:

  • Mexico City “55” + 8 digits, area code is 55
  • Guadalajara “33” + 8 digits, area code is 33
  • Monterrey “81” + 8 digits, area code is 81
  • All other cities in Mexico “3 digits” + 7 digits, area code contains 3 digits

If you were to dial Mexico City: “011” + “52” + “55” + telephone number (8 digits)

If you were to dial Acapulco: “011” + “52” + “744” + telephone number (7 digits).

  • UPDATE October 17, 2006 – If you are dialing a Mexican cellphone from the USA after November 4, 2006, you must dial “011” – “52”- “1” -“Area Code” – “Telephone number”, this new rule covers 90% of the cellular phones in Mexico. Changes for Dialing Long Distance to Cellular Phones in Mexico

Selected area codes for some Mexican cities:

 

Acapulco “744” + 7 digits
Aguascalientes “449”+ 7 digits
Apizaco “241”
+ 7 digits
Cabo San Lucas “624”
+ 7 digits
C
ancun “998”+ 7 digits
Celaya “461”
+ 7 digits
Chihuahua “614”
+ 7 digits
Ciudad del Carmen “938”
+ 7 digits
Ciudad Juarez “656”+ 7 digits
Cuernavaca “777”
+ 7 digits
Culiacan “667”
+ 7 digits
Durango “618”
+ 7 digits
Ensenada “646”
+ 7 digits
Guadalajara “33” + 8 digits
Guanajuato “473” + 7 digits
Irapuato “462”+ 7 digits
Ixtapa “755 + 7 digits
Jalapa “932” + 7 digits
Juchita “971” + 7 digits
Leon “477” + 7 digits
Los Mochis “668” + 7 digits
Matamoros “871”
+ 7 digits
Mazatlan “869”
+ 7 digits
Merida “999”
+ 7 digits
Mexicali “686”
+ 7 digits
Mexico City “55” + 8 digits
Monterrey “81” + 8 digit
Morelia “443” + 7 digits
Nogales “631”
+ 7 digits
Nuevo Laredo “867”
+ 7 digits
Oaxaca de Juarez “951”
+ 7 digits
Playa del Carmen “984”
+ 7 digits
Progreso “861”
+ 7 digits
Puebla “222”
+ 7 digits
Puerto Vallarta “322” + 7 digits
Reynosa “899” + 7 digits
Saltillo “844” + 7 digits
San Francisco del Rincon “476”
+ 7 digits
San Miguel Allende “415” + 7 digits
Silao “472” + 7 digits
Tampico “833” + 7 digits
Tijuana “664” + 7 digits
Torreon “871” + 7 digits
Veracruz “229” + 7 digits
Villahermosa
“993” + 7 digits

intl. access + country code + area code + telephone number

“011” + “52” + “2 or 3 digit area code” + “7 or 8 digit telephone number”

For a complete list of all Mexican cities, check out the TELMEX area code search page (in spanish) Link

 

Related Links

What to dial in order to reach a cellular phone in Mexico

How to do business in Mexico

How to negotiate with Mexican business people

Mexican official (and unofficial) holidays

Advice on what to expect when doing business with Mexico

Meeting people in Mexico – kiss, shake hands or hug?

Before you go on your business trip to Mexico

Tipping Guidelines for Mexico

Official Government websites of the 32 Mexican states





International business travel, the end of an era?

11 08 2006

Once again the airline industry is about to have their security guidelines changed in order to accomodate new perceived threats by terrorists. The arrest of 24+ people in London involved in plotting terror attacks aboard airplanes is being heralded in the press and blog world as the end of business travel, the end of an era.

It’s true that business travellers will be the most affected group if new security regulations are put in place to limit carry-on luggage, liquids and electronic equipment. International business travellers will surely suffer most, 8 to 14 hour flights beg for a carry on bag crammed with items that may now be eliminated by new regulations.

The thought of making the trip from LA to Hong Kong, without my water bottle, my contact lens solution, saline spray, Ipod and reading material would make me seek an alternative. Perhaps I would pass the opportunity to meet face to face, and try to do the business via telephone, VOIP, or fax, accepting that fact that the outcome wouldn’t be the same. How many others would do the same?

I believe face to face meetings are an essential part of doing business, and more so for international relationships. But there comes a time when the trip itself is so painful and uncomfortable that we do seek alternatives that are easier and more pleasant, or we charge more in order to suffer the inconvenience.

Two thoughts come to mind:

1. How will global business be affected? How many of us will seek an supplier or customer that is closer to home? How will business change if international travel is severely affected? Will business travellers embrace communication technology in order to make things happen as they used to? Will international business travellers request more compensation, raising the cost of doing business?

2. What will the airlines do to adapt and make it safe and comfortable for their business travel customers? Will they provide, contact lens solution, creams, and bottled water for their customers as part of the standard service? How can they turn this gigantic lemon into lemonade?





How to do Business in Mexico, Part 6

7 06 2006

Things NOT to talk about

I would recommend listening and watching others before making any comments or bringing up potentially “difficult” themes (religion, politics, abortion, immigration).  Get a feel for your group and their interests (and opinions) before blundering in your comments, criticisms and “great ideas”.    Be very careful NOT to bluster, rant and rave or carry on about how magnificent and wonderful the US is compared to Mexico.

If asked your personal opinion about a “difficult” theme, be honest, but remember to keep it light and brief. 

Many Mexicans want you to explain US government policies and culture, immigration decisions, economic policies…. if this is not possible, be honest and don’t enter areas of conflict or spread misinformation.

Disclaimer The ideas presented are personal opinions and generalizations based upon 25+ years interacting, living and working in and with Mexico.  None of this may be true, use the information at your own risk





Current Resume – Lee Iwan – March 2007

27 04 2006

 

Lee Iwan

International Business Development

Sales & Management Executive

Accomplished bilingual and bi-cultural executive with broad based domestic and international experience in business discovery and development; sales, marketing and operations for start-ups, growth and mature organizations.

Results oriented, proven success in new market identification, strategic thinking, negotiations and pragmatic problem solving. Track record of “hands on” leadership increasing communication, sales, efficiency and profitability.

Thrive in dynamic and fluid environments requiring enthusiasm, creativity, communication skills and organization.

Core competencies include:

Relationships and Communication

Team Leadership

Cross Culture Liaison

Innovation and Change Management

Global Focus

Entrepreneurial Focus

Contingency Planning

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

QUIMICA CENTRAL DE MEXICO S.A. de C.V. Leon, Gto., México July 1998 – Present

Business Manager, Strategic Business Discovery & Development May 2005 – Present

Serve as independent executive working directly with CEO and Board of Directors. Fully responsible for the visualization, research, creation, communication, follow-through, analysis, planning and implementation of new business development and corporate strategic diversification projects.

Key Achievements:

  • Project Leader, pharmaceutical joint venture (Swiss-México), manufacturing and commercial operations .
  • Spearheading strategic alliance negotiations to increase long-term market share and global positioning.
  • Ongoing negotiations with India and China for product representations, agencies and toll manufacturing.

Business Manager, International Business March 2000 – May 2005

Served as Business Manager, responsible for global sales and marketing, distribution and logistics, and all corporate international negotiations with clients and suppliers.

Directed export sales and market development, international supplier strategic alliances; leadership of export sales distribution and agency networks; cross-functional team participation; business intelligence; sales and marketing strategy and leadership for the Asia Pacific and Latin American regions; sales implementation and market development; logistics and supply chain management, cross cultural communications, “globalization” of company culture and corporate special projects.

Key Achievements:

  • Created and implemented commercial entrance for Asia-Pacific market, first 3 years revenue $ 5 M (US), projected annual sales growth of 200%.
  • Initiated and maintained strategic alliances with international suppliers, raw material cost savings of $ 2 M (US) fortified long term strategic positioning.
  • Negotiated exclusive agency representations in Mexico for South African and US specialty chemical manufacturers.
  • Increased company global competitiveness utilizing the export department to drive corporate cultural changes in strategic planning, production, time to market, supply chain and logistics, sales, marketing and administration.

Export Manager July 1998 – March 2000

Served as Export Manager, responsible for sales, distribution and marketing strategy and management for 20 countries including Latin America, US, Europe and Taiwan.

Key Achievements:

  • Created new commission and base price structure for agents and distributors resulting in increased loyalty and increased revenue of 8%.
  • Re-engineered department systems to increase revenue and customer loyalty through increased efficiency in communications, administrative processes and product shipping.
  • Managed international sales force in Latin America and Asia Pacific regions (18 distributors / agents).

NUVIDA S.A. de C.V., León, Guanajuato, México January 1993 – July 1998

Owner–President–Entrepreneur

Served as President for start-up specialty service business, corporate and government clients.

Key Achievements:

  • Alliance between private industry, State and Local government to create and maintain 100-acre interactive ecological area – Parque Explora.
  • Managed workforce of 45.
  • First workforce in the State to receive State Certification (training and operations procedures).

FLOWERS FLOWERS INC., Evanston, IL, USA March 1986 – August 1993 Owner–President-Entrepreneur

Served as President for start-up innovative luxury consumer goods and service business.

Responsibilities included: strategy and planning, management, sales and marketing, purchasing and operations.

EDUCATION

Bachelor of Science Agricultural Economics * University of Illinois – Urbana, IL 1980

PROFESSIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Board Member, State Chemical Industry Export Committee, COFOCE, February 2007 – Present

Weblog: Business South of the Border August 2006 – Present

Weblog: Lee Iwan Accumulated Experience April 2006- Present

Business Development Mission, Chennai, India, February 2007

Chromium Industry Conference, Cape Town, South Africa, February 2006

Commercial Mission, New Delhi, Mumbai India, November 2005

Course: Finance for Non-Financial Managers, 2005

Business Development Mission: Buenos Aires, Argentina, 2004

Board Member, State Leather Industry Consulting Committee, COFOCE, 2000 – Present

ANPIC, Mexican Leather Industry Fair, Leon, Gto., Mexico, 1999 – Present

ISO 9001:2000, Certification Process, 2003 – 2006

Business Development Mission: Geneva, Switzerland & Moscow, Russia, 2004

Business Development Mission: Istanbul, Turkey, 2003

All China Leather Exhibition (ACLE), Shanghai, China 2002 – 2005

Guangzhou Leather Fair, Guangzhou, China, 2002 – 2005

Business Development: Geneva, Switzerland, 2002

Commercial Mission: Mexico – Central America, 2000 – 2002

Asia Pacific Leather Fair, Hong Kong, 1999 – 2005

Linneapelle, Bologna, Italy, 1999 – 2005

Commercial Mission: Mexico – China, 2000 – 2001

Business Development: Amsterdam, Holland, 2000

Business Development: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, 2000

Miami Leather Fair, Miami, FL, USA 1999 –2001

Business Development: Uruguay, Brazil, Argentina, 1999

FENAC, Leather Fair, Novo Hamburgo, Brazil, 1999

Course: Mexican International Commerce Legislation, 2001 – 2004

Diploma: Modifications in the Mexican Customs Legislation, 2003

Diploma: International Commerce – Logistics, 2001

Diploma: International Commerce, 2000

Course: The Strategic Salesperson, 1999

Periodico AM, Newspaper Columnist. 1994 – 1996

Society of American Florists, Editorial Board, 1990 – 1992

Chicago-Dempster Merchants Association, Vice President, 1988 – 1990

Lee.iwan@gmail.com