The 3 Y’s – help for difficult decisions

29 06 2007

An organization’s management and leadership team is responsible for making timely decisions, supplying and applying resources when required, in order to efficiently reach known or perceived goals and objectives.

In order to make these decisions; research, information and analysis of the pertinent information is required.

Here is where management bogs down or leadership can make serious misjudgements.

  • Poor incomplete analysis or lack of the critical information required to assess the risks, obtain the required resources or understand the probable benefits.
  • Lack of understanding of the changes or resources that the decision will provoke.
  • Making the decision too early, or too late.

A quick and useful trick is to apply the “3 Y’s” to assist when faced with a difficult decision.

The “3 Y’s”

  • Why Me?
  • Why Now?
  • Why Not?

The First Why – Why Me?

  • Who is requesting that I make the decision? Why?
  • Is this in my area of responsibility? Why?
  • Is this my area of expertise, do I know what I’m doing? Why?
  • Do I have enough key information to make the decision? Why?
  • Can I obtain more information, in how much time and at what cost? Why?
  • Do I understand the analysis of the data and the conclusions? Why?

The Second Why – Why Now?

  • Does this need to be done or decided now? Why?
  • Is it in response to an emergency, part of “normal” operations or a change in strategy and objectives? Why?
  • Who depends upon this decision or is affected by it? Why?
  • Should the involved parties be informed of how the decision will affect them? Why?

The Third Why – Why Not?

  • What happens if I don’t make the decision? Why?
  • Are there other options, solutions, or alternatives? Why?
  • Do I think this is the best solution or decision available? Why?
  • Do I fully understand the short term and long term effects on resources, customers, work systems, goals and objectives that this decision will provoke? Why?
  • Who are the internal or external “experts”, what is their recommendation? Why?
  • How far am I putting the organization at risk with this decision? Why?
  • Are there metrics to measure or contingency plans in place in case this does not go as planned? Why?

By reacting and making difficult decisions without reflecting on the WHY we miss identifying the real problems and issues.

We miss solutions and strategies.

We miss opportunities to unify and support the organization.

We find ourselves responding to symptoms and not solving or responding to the core issues.

Related Links

Can’t make a decision

9 steps to better decisions


Actions

Information

One response

9 08 2007
Barbara White

The 3 whys are a good way to help you make the best possible decision. I als thoink it is very important to not deal with the symptoms, but fine the root cause of the issue. Annother dimension not mentioned that is also important is to get some input and feedback from the employees who will be directly affected by the decision. Giving them the opportunity to express their thoughts will mean that the reaction when the decision comes down the line will not be so negative, as they have had some input and the decision is not just imposed on them.

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