The Definitive Business Travel Guide – Leon Guanajuato

3 11 2010

“The Definitive Business Travel Guide – Leon Guanajuato” was written specifically for English-speaking international business people who want increase their efficiency and business results when working in Leon, Guanajuato.

Leon Guanajuato Business Travel Guide

The Definitive Business Travel Guide - Leon Guanajuato

Every business traveler knows the amount of time and energy dedicated to learning about basic infrastructure and logistics for an international trip. Time and energy that is devoted to non-business activities instead of focusing on the business issues and results you need.

Get your copy here

Wouldn’t it be great to have a guide that gives you the important information you need to get to Leon and start working as soon as you get off the plane?

I have seen and worked with hundreds of first time business visitors to Leon, and this E-book is based upon their questions, comments and advice on how to make a business trip to Leon, Guanajuato easier and more efficient.

CLICK HERE TO GET YOUR COPY

I wrote ‘The Definitive Business Travel Guide – Leon Guanajuato 2011 Edition”, an insider’s business guide to Leon, with answers to your important questions about; where to stay, how to travel, logistics, food, what business customs make a difference in starting a business relationship, what is the best way to get started working in Leon, Guanajuato.

Special 2010 pre-launch price, USD $ 23.95 until December 31, 2010.

Buy it here





New website for Lee Iwan

7 08 2010

I have moved to a new website  LeeIwan.com!

Popular posts from the old site Lee Iwan Accumulated Experience will be updated and migrated, and new material added to the new site at breakneck speed.

By visiting and participating you will get insight and learn about the attitudes, actions and strategies that will increase results and reduce errors with international and Mexican business projects.

Examples:

  • How to effectively start a business relationship in Mexico
  • How to develop a strategic plan for the Mexican market
  • How to develop a realistic business plan – objectives and chronologies
  • How to creating trust and confidence from your first meeting
  • The “right way” to approach Mexican business people
  • How to find the right people in Mexico
  • How to integrate the secrets of doing business in Mexico into your activities and communications
  • How to avoid the most common mistakes that can sabotage you
  • How to construct a solid base of reliable  knowledge and contacts
  • How to focus and get results in each stage of business development:  investigation, cultivation, harvest
  • How to create a positive image based on actions and deeds
  • How to maximize your customer visits, trade fairs and commercial missions
  • How to avoid cultural mistakes in Mexico
  • How to use the power of patience to guarantee success
  • How to use communications to avoid misunderstandings and increase commitment to the business
  • How to avoid the stereotypes that will kill the deal
  • How to find the decision-makers in Mexico
  • How to find the resources and reliable information to make informed decisions
  • How to understand the Mexican business environment, how business people think, what they consider important, how they make decisions and why
  • How to surround yourself with support service experts to avoid costly start-up errors

Thanks for stopping by, please leave a comment, idea or your observations on how I might improve the site and information.

Lee

Website – Lee Iwan.com





Scenario planning and annual budgets

7 01 2010

Did you make a annual budget for 2010?

Bet it wasn’t easy.

Did you think about all the different scenarios that might happen in 2010, and incorporate those variables into several budgets, or was your final product one single annual budget?

I am not a fan of annual budgets unless they are tied into Scenario Planning.

I believe that they are a necessary exercise that helps in anticipating what revenue and resources a company might require in the coming year.  But I truly dislike those who compare real results with a static budget created 6 months or a year prior.

Businesses cannot perform  “as planned” in rapidly changing environments.  Budgets can serve as guides for spending and investment if properly assembled, taking into account internal and external factors of influence.

I am almost sure your budget made in October or November needs to be redone (if you want it to reflect real results) in order to reflect the massive changes that have already occurred in the economy and business environment.

In chaotic times, when uncertainty is the only sure thing, the traditional budget process can be a waste of time for the people making them, and for those “using” them if scenario planning is not taking place.

When the environment is subject to so many significant changes that will affect our suppliers, costs, customers consumption, international competition, etc., it is wiser to make several budget scenarios.

These scenarios will contemplate and plan for possible (or impossible) significant changes in the business environment, and help the organization to quickly take advantage of the situation when and if they occur.

What if oil prices plummet, or skyrocket?

What if inflation takes off, or recession gets worse?

What if there is a massive terrorist attack?

What if there is an economic collapse in Asia?

What if our number one supplier closes their doors?

What if the automobile and construction industries fall deeper into a slump?

What if the USA puts huge import duties on imported products?

It’s not about guessing what will happen (traditional budget).

It’s all about preparing to what MIGHT happen (budget scenarios).

How many scenarios should a company create?   As many as possible in order to analyze the strategic impact on the entire supply chain, cost structure and customers buying patterns.  It’s having a battle plan A, B, C, and D.

This budget scenario exercise is an ongoing process that involves risk assessment, prediction of economic consequences to potential or real events, and should involve the entire management team.  Depending on the actual environment and conditions this assessment might take place several times a year.

The identification of risk areas that will have significant effect on revenue or costs,  and the  acceptance that things will continue to change, will enable your organization to thrive and survive during turbulent times.

Links

How to do Scenario Planning

Scenario Planning

The Secret of Successful Scenario Planning





Stop telling me how free it is

6 01 2010

I don’t trust anyone or anything that tells me that something is ” free”.

Experience has also taught me that anyone actively promoting how “free” something is has a very special and usually monetary goal…to get me to buy something later.

If it is free, if you are giving it away with “no strings attached”, why are you promoting it and telling me?

If you are such a wonderful samaritan and altruistic person or organization, then why insist that I understand it is free?

Giving something away?  Just put it out there, let me pick it up, use it, read it, learn from it, watch it, or whatever…and then let me walk away without chasing after me trying to sign me up or charge me for something else, or looking for me to pat you on the back.

Part of the delight of finding something “free” is that it not overly promoted as being free, it’s a surprise, a delight.

If you are going to give something away, just do it, don’t make a spectacle out of your “good will” and “good intentions”….let others do that for you.





What signals are you sending?

5 01 2010

If you received NO economic benefit from your job.  Would you continue to do it?

If you answered “no”, think about what message and attitude you are sending to your clients, co-workers and business network.

If you answered “yes”, think about how this makes you different and unique to your customers, clients, contacts and relationships.





Who’s to blame?

4 01 2010

Don’t blame the world.

Don’t blame the boss.

Don’t blame your co workers.

Don’t blame the customer.

It’s all about our ability or inability to convince them.

It’s all about sales.

Our ability to “sell” the proposal, to “sell” our achievements, to “sell” our value,  to “sell our enthusiasm”, to “sell” our ideas.

If we find ourselves blaming others, it is time to change your plan, change your arguments, attitudes or presentation.

It’s our responsibility, not theirs.

Find a way to convince your audience, co workers, boss or clients, to make them enthusiastic or to understand.

If the customer wants red, and you want to sell blue, find the way to convince them that blue really IS better.

Or find those customers who want and need blue.

Or change what you are doing and sell red.

It’s not about the others inability to understand.

Stop making it their fault.

It’s all about our ability to provide the information, arguments and ideas that allow them to understand.

Stop pointing fingers and assigning blame.

It’s all about us.





It will never work

15 02 2009

When trying to change behaviors, habits, routines or goals in a company on of the first difficulties faced is the opposition from co-workers, employees and team members.

“It won’t work”.

“Completely wrong”.

“They don’t understand the problem, this is crazy”.

Ï’m not going to waste my time on this, it’s stupid”.

They might be right.  It might be stupid, crazy, it won’t work…but it is never a waste of time.

Change, applying new and disruptive methods to operations and problem solving, is always a gamble, and always generates resistance, and many times will not solve the problem.

People say they want change, but only change that has no cost or discomfort associated with it.

Changes will always..always.. always…stimulate new ideas, and get people talking, and more importantly thinking about the problem, the solutions or the process.

This new dialogue, about what is the real problem, about what is a better solution, is what we are after.

Creating and implementing new ideas, creating chaos in some cases, forces people to move out of a “comfort” zone.

Don’t be afraid to hear “it won’t work”, that may be exactly what the team needs to respond.

Your reply should be “OK, what is a better solution?”  Do not focus on defending the idea, get the conversation going how best to solve the problem, or define the problem.








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